.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Cooking

  • The aroma of roasting chicken thighs, rosemary and oranges

    I am still amazed that I knew almost nothing about chicken thighs until I moved here more than 10 years ago. We ate a lot of chicken breasts and whole chickens, but I always thought the thighs didn’t have much meat on them. Not anymore! Now I can’t get enough of them. I can’t even seem to over-cook them. They always come out juicy and tender.

  • Rice is a natural convenience food: easy to store, ready to use

    Rice is a versatile accompaniment to almost any meal. It’s easy to store and is always ready to use; no washing, no peeling and no chopping is required.
    All varieties of rice can be grouped into three basic categories: long grain, medium grain and short grain.
    Long grain rice, slender and four to five times as long as it is wide, cooks into fluffy, separate grains and is most often used in entrées, soups and pilafs or even as a side dish.

  • Sweated onions, carrots and celery deliver a ‘trinity’ of flavor

    The simple trinity of ordinary vegetables, commonly called mirepoix, forms the foundation of a myriad of dishes. You’ve probably made it a thousand times without even knowing it. It’s one of the essentials of classical French cooking, but equally important in all cooking.

  • The combination of mustard and crumbs makes for ‘deviled’ recipes

    Have you ever wondered where the term “deviled” (as in deviled eggs) came from? The term actually dates back to the 18th century, apparently linked to Hell’s temperature. Today, it can apply to anything that will benefit from serious seasoning.

  • Thai chicken satay with peanut dipping sauce is worth a try

    If you’re in the mood for something different but don’t really want to go out to eat, you can’t go wrong with some delicious Thai chicken satay served on skewers with your own homemade peanut dipping sauce.
    This dish is easy and takes less than an hour to prep and cook. Strips of chicken, beef or pork are marinated in an easy-to-make Thai marinade, and then skewered and grilled or broiled in the oven. The skewered meat is then served with your own homemade peanut sauce for the ultimate taste sensation. Satay also makes for a terrific party food.

  • Some classic French dessert recipes are not so difficult to make

    Some of my favorite dessert recipes sure to please everyone are classic French recipes suitable for your family meals or for entertaining family and friends. And the best part is...they’re not so difficult to make.
    You’ve heard people always say that the “proof of the pudding is in the eating.” Once you have made any of these classic desserts, you’ll be eating them more and more. If you are as passionate about your food as I am, your love affair with French desserts will grow.

  • Using fewer ingredients still offers delicious taste and nutrition

    Many of you have asked for recipes with a limited number of ingredients. When checking out my database, a number of cookbooks and even those online, I’ve found that five ingredients seem to be the magic number.
    By using what is in your pantry (and just a few additional items), you can keep dinner simple and affordable and just as healthy and delicious. These recipes all use minimal ingredients, not counting salt, pepper, various herbs and seasonings and a liquid, yet still offer wonderful taste and good nutrition.

  • Tofu easily absorbs new flavors through spices or marinades

    Tofu is made from soybeans, water and a coagulant, or curdling agent. Loved in Asia for centuries, it is high in protein and calcium and has the ability to absorb new flavors, whether through spices or marinades.
    For those of you who have never used it or even know what it is, tofu is considered to be a good meat substitute, as it is rich in protein. Since it has no flavor of its own, tofu can easily pick up almost any flavor that you add to it.

  • Anyone for anchovies?

    Anchovies are like a martini. Either you love them or you can’t stand them! There doesn’t seem to be much middle ground when it comes to these salty, silvery saltwater fish.
    Most of us are familiar with anchovy oil, which is full of nutrients and is often a key ingredient used in authentic Italian cooking, especially pasta and pizza. It is used as a foundation in many flavorful sauces, including Worcestershire sauce and Caesar salad dressing. Although anchovy oil is high in cholesterol and is loaded with sodium, it’s OK to use it in moderation.

  • Preparing warm, succulent, rare prime rib for two at home

    For many families, serving prime rib for Christmas or New Year’s has become a tradition, but what if you want a discreet little prime rib dinner for two? The simple answer might be, “head for a local steak house.”
    But if you have an overwhelming desire for that warm, succulent, rare prime rib at home, you’ll need a small piece of meat. Preparing a small roast with that desired salty, crusty, flavorful outside and beautifully rare inside is almost impossible if you use the conventional oven method.