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Cooking

  • Just like bacon, a little garlic goes good with everything

    “Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian; wine and tarragon make it French; sour cream makes it Russian; lemon and cinnamon make it Greek; soy sauce makes it Chinese; but garlic makes it good.”
    —Alice May Brock of Alice’s Restaurant fame

  • Authentic Creole or Cajun gumbo requires okra or filé powder

    The Spanish gave Creole food its spices, and also paella, which was the forefather of Louisiana’s jambalaya. Cajun cuisine is characterized by the use of wild game, seafood, wild vegetation and herbs.
    Bouillabaisse, a soup that came from the Provence region of France in and around Marseilles, played a part in the creation of gumbo.

  • Pork loin roasts can be easily prepared for the grill

    One of the most tender and juiciest parts of a pig is the loin roast, which comes from the area between the shoulder and the beginning of the leg.
    A deboned loin roast can be rolled and tied with string. Loin roasts with a bone tend to be juicier and more flavorful, but carving it can be a bit tricky.

  • The aroma of roasting chicken thighs, rosemary and oranges

    I am still amazed that I knew almost nothing about chicken thighs until I moved here more than 10 years ago. We ate a lot of chicken breasts and whole chickens, but I always thought the thighs didn’t have much meat on them. Not anymore! Now I can’t get enough of them. I can’t even seem to over-cook them. They always come out juicy and tender.

  • Rice is a natural convenience food: easy to store, ready to use

    Rice is a versatile accompaniment to almost any meal. It’s easy to store and is always ready to use; no washing, no peeling and no chopping is required.
    All varieties of rice can be grouped into three basic categories: long grain, medium grain and short grain.
    Long grain rice, slender and four to five times as long as it is wide, cooks into fluffy, separate grains and is most often used in entrées, soups and pilafs or even as a side dish.

  • Sweated onions, carrots and celery deliver a ‘trinity’ of flavor

    The simple trinity of ordinary vegetables, commonly called mirepoix, forms the foundation of a myriad of dishes. You’ve probably made it a thousand times without even knowing it. It’s one of the essentials of classical French cooking, but equally important in all cooking.

  • The combination of mustard and crumbs makes for ‘deviled’ recipes

    Have you ever wondered where the term “deviled” (as in deviled eggs) came from? The term actually dates back to the 18th century, apparently linked to Hell’s temperature. Today, it can apply to anything that will benefit from serious seasoning.

  • Thai chicken satay with peanut dipping sauce is worth a try

    If you’re in the mood for something different but don’t really want to go out to eat, you can’t go wrong with some delicious Thai chicken satay served on skewers with your own homemade peanut dipping sauce.
    This dish is easy and takes less than an hour to prep and cook. Strips of chicken, beef or pork are marinated in an easy-to-make Thai marinade, and then skewered and grilled or broiled in the oven. The skewered meat is then served with your own homemade peanut sauce for the ultimate taste sensation. Satay also makes for a terrific party food.

  • Some classic French dessert recipes are not so difficult to make

    Some of my favorite dessert recipes sure to please everyone are classic French recipes suitable for your family meals or for entertaining family and friends. And the best part is...they’re not so difficult to make.
    You’ve heard people always say that the “proof of the pudding is in the eating.” Once you have made any of these classic desserts, you’ll be eating them more and more. If you are as passionate about your food as I am, your love affair with French desserts will grow.

  • Using fewer ingredients still offers delicious taste and nutrition

    Many of you have asked for recipes with a limited number of ingredients. When checking out my database, a number of cookbooks and even those online, I’ve found that five ingredients seem to be the magic number.
    By using what is in your pantry (and just a few additional items), you can keep dinner simple and affordable and just as healthy and delicious. These recipes all use minimal ingredients, not counting salt, pepper, various herbs and seasonings and a liquid, yet still offer wonderful taste and good nutrition.