.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Cooking

  • Fennel is a classic flavoring for fish, soups and vegetables

    A member of the dill family, fennel has a sweet anise flavor, which is due to a chemical known as anethole, which is 13 times sweeter than sugar. This compound is also found in star anise. Its flavor is strongest when eaten raw and declines slightly as it is cooked. Both the feathery leaves, which resemble dill, and its seeds, are commonly used.

  • For entertaining friends and relatives, try these holiday appetizers

     

    Are you planning to go out on New Year’s or stay home with many of your friends and relatives? We used to go out a lot, but lately we’re just comfortable staying put and maybe having a few friends stop by during the day to enjoy the new year.

    If you’re going to be staying at home and are expecting guests to pop in, why not have some scrumptious holiday appetizers for everyone to munch on while downing a favorite beverage of choice? These are not only good on holidays, but just about any other time of the year.

     

  • Christmas dinner traditions are celebrated throughout the world

     We all look forward to that customary Christmas dinner of roast turkey (or ham) garnished with chestnuts, vegetables and cranberry sauce. Afterwards, all those homemade cookies and other delectable sweets await.

    Most every country has its own Christmas dinner traditions, but the food served differs from country to country.

  • Christmas dinner traditions are celebrated throughout the world

     We all look forward to that customary Christmas dinner of roast turkey (or ham) garnished with chestnuts, vegetables and cranberry sauce. Afterwards, all those homemade cookies and other delectable sweets await.

    Most every country has its own Christmas dinner traditions, but the food served differs from country to country.

  • Don’t forget about the great tradition of holiday drinks

     Entertaining for the holidays? Make that gathering a little more festive and special by extending the holiday spirit to the drinks and refreshments you offer your guests.

    Think about preparing some of the more popular traditional holiday cheer, and maybe a few more. I’ve included spiriteddrinks and a few non-alcoholic drinks and punches for those less rowdy.

     

  • After Thanksgiving, cookies will be king for the next few weeks

     

    ‘Tis the season of home baking, be they cutouts, bars, slice-and-bake, spritz or drop cookies. Whether you’re like me and dig through a stack of yellowed recipe cards to find that favorite heirloom or prefer trying out some new exotic version of peanut butter cookies, it’s time to dust off those cookie sheets and preheat the oven.

    And what aroma better captures the fragrance of the season?

  • You know what cold weather means? It’s soup season!

     During the winter months, a piping hot bowl of soup is the ultimate comfort food. Not just any kind of soup either, but serious, hearty, soul-warming soup that’s thick enough to stand a spoon up in.

    Whether you’re in the mood for seasonal produce like squash, pumpkin and potatoes, or the preserved flavors of summer like tomatoes and fruit, there are plenty of satisfying, hearty soup recipes to choose from for you and your whole family.

  • What are you going to do with all those Turkey Day leftovers?

      Thanksgiving is probably the biggest “leftover” holiday of the year. The traditional turkey day is over with and you stand there in wonderment at the mounds of leftovers and the guilt starts to set in. The mashed potatoes, the sweet potatoes, the dressing, the various vegetable side dishes and all that gravy … what are you going to do with all of it?

  • Brining your turkey will result in a moister, more flavorful bird

     That beautiful, bronzed, succulent roast turkey! For most of us, the Thanksgiving dinner usually revolves around the big bird. This is probably one of the easiest parts of the meal. Preparing all the other dishes that complement the bird and making sure they’re all done at the same time is the real challenge.

    Most of us buy a frozen turkey and thaw it ahead of time. It takes at least 24 hours in the refrigerator for every 5 pounds of turkey, so a 20-pound bird will take four to five days to thaw.

     

  • After all these years, I still enjoy writing this column

     

    I have been writing this food column for more than 10 years now, and recently a friend of mine asked me how I came up with all my ideas to write about each week. I told him I had this long checklist made up of possible food articles and I just checked them off week after week. I probably had enough for 10 years! “Really?” he asked.