• The flavor and aroma of freshly cut herbs enhance any cooked meal

     Ever wonder who first thought of eating a tomato with fresh basil, or combining sage with onion in a stuffing, or lamb with rosemary and garlic? I know … who cares? But most of the flavor-enhancing herbs we enjoy today were prized by the earliest cultures to improve the flavor of often dull and limited meals.

  • It’s Memorial Day weekend and time for some fishin’ and grillin’

     The Memorial Day weekend is traditionally the beginning of the grilling season for many in this area. On the South Brunswick Islands, it signals the beginning of a new season of fishing, golfing and cookouts or just relaxing at home, soaking up the sun and taking it easy.

  • Basil pairs naturally with tomatoes — a marriage made in heaven

     A member of the mint family, basil is a delicate herb and deteriorates rapidly after harvesting. Try to use as it as fresh as possible. Just store it like other herbs, either wrapped in damp paper towels inside a plastic bag or inserted in a container of water like flowers in a vase.

  • When cooking outdoors, follow these barbecue food safety tips

     Once only a summer activity shared with family and friends, more than half of Americans say they are cooking outdoors year round.

    It’s the season for picnics, cookouts and other outdoor parties. But eating outdoors in warm weather presents a food safety challenge. Use these simple guidelines for grilling food safely to prevent harmful bacteria from multiplying and causing food-borne illness.


    Defrosting meat and poultry

  • The celebration of Cinco de Mayo is a worldwide event

        Cinco de Mayo in Spanish means the fifth of May. Most of the Cinco de Mayo celebrations that take place occur in the town of Puebla, the site of the Mexican army’s unlikely victory over French forces in 1862.

  • Boneless, skinless chicken breasts: the ultimate fast food for family and guests

        If you’re like me, boneless chicken breasts can be boring. I’ve published many recipes for chicken breasts and I’m sure you have plenty of your own you’ve tried over the years.

    I’ve prepared sautéed, fried, baked, grilled and even pouched chicken breasts. I’ve stuffed, barbecued, breaded, chopped and even pureed when making a chicken spread. But the easiest way, for me, is to just sauté skinless, boneless chicken breasts in a little oil and butter and then add a special sauce at the end of my liking.

  • Local produce farms have strawberries ready for pickin’

        Strawberries typically peak during May in the South and in June and July in the North. Local farmers markets in our area now have strawberries ripe for the pickin’.

    If you like to pick your own, be sure to take a couple of plastic buckets with you to load up on the local favorites. My wife and I used to indulge in picking are own strawberries at Holden Brothers Farm Market. In recent years, though, I leave the pickin’ to the younger folks.


    Picking strawberries

  • Spring is here and it’s time to fire up the grill


    Grilling food seems to be gaining popularity with the rise of the TV food shows. I can remember when our choices were only Julia Child, Graham Kerr and my favorite, the late Jeff Smith, “The Frugal Gourmet.”

    The availability of indoor grills, sometimes built into the stovetop, has helped spur interest in this oldest form of cooking. There’s just something about that grilled flavor that really adds draws people in.

  • Carrots make a tasty and healthy addition to any meal

      Did you know carrots started out being red, dark yellow, white and purple in color? Everything but orange! Carrots started with yellow flesh and a purple exterior, but it was the Dutch who developed the orange carrot, and then the French who developed it into the elongated carrot we eat today.

    Mel Blanc was not very fond of carrots but ate them while voicing Bugs Bunny.

  • Ramen noodles have come a long way since my college days

     In 1958, instant ramen noodles were invented in Japan. Ramen is the Japanese pronunciation for “lo mein” or “lau mein” in Chinese, and primarily refers to noodles in a soup broth. Because of the ease of preparation and rich flavor of these noodles, consumption of ramen noodle soup use quickly expanded worldwide.