.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Cooking

  • Tired of plain old mashed potatoes? Try rutabaga or turnips instead

    Turnips are members of the mustard family and have been around since ancient times, while rutabagas (also called Swede turnips) originated in Scandinavia.
    Rutabagas usually need to be peeled, but turnips don’t really need to be, but we seem to do it anyway.
    Both can be eaten raw in a salad or cooked up alone or used in a stew, as a sauté, in soups or just mashed. My preferred method is to roast them.

  • What is the best way to cook a moist, tender London broil?

    Contrary to what many believe, London broil is a manner of preparing the meat, not actually a cut of meat. They are famous for being especially moist and tender.
    London broil is a cut of flank steak or top round, generally about 1 inch thick, and is typically prepared by broiling the steak.
    The trick is to cut this steak into thin slices against the grain before serving. This will ensure that the meat is easiest to cut and chew.

  • Taken in moderation, beer is actually a healthy food

    Once considered a food staple, beer has been around in one form or another for more than 8,000 years. And with all these new studies that actually show that beer is healthy, in moderation, why not cook with beer?
    Years ago, physicians were known to use beer liberally for various cures. Due to the brewing process when making beer, it was actually safer to drink than either water or milk. Because of this, beer was often used when mixing medicines and used in many food recipes in place of water.

  • Crabmeat is nutritious and low in fat and high in protein

    Although crabs are available year-round in coastal areas, they are mostly consumed during the summer months, probably due to the summer tourist migration to the shores.
    Along our eastern seaboard, the blue crab reigns supreme. It’s available fresh and pasteurized in lump, backfin and claw meat.

  • Don’t confuse a pork loin roast with a tenderloin

    A pork loin roast is often confused with a tenderloin. Despite their name similarity, rest assured they are not one in the same.
    Pork loin roasts are especially flavorful when first brined or then rubbed with a spice mixture and barbecued over indirect heat, cooked on a rotisserie or just baked in the oven. They should never be braised or stewed, since they have a tendency to lose their tenderness and just fall apart when cooked using moist heat.

  • Balsamic vinegar brings out the fresh flavor of herbs

    Balsamic vinegar from Modena and Reggio, Italy, are the only true balsamic vinegars in the world. The vinegars produced in these provinces are truly the finest one can buy.
    Balsamic vinegar has a variety of uses, including drizzling on baked potatoes instead of using butter or sour cream, or over steamed vegetables, in place of soy sauce in stir-fried vegetables and as a substitute for salt with either meat or poultry.

  • New Year’s food will bring you luck throughout the year

    Do any of you have any special foods that you eat on New Year’s Day to bring good luck?
    We always have pork and sauerkraut on New Year’s Day. I don’t exactly know why. This is just a tradition passed down from generation to generation. Pork and sauerkraut is always the first meal of the year. It’s supposed to bring good luck throughout the year. I have no idea why.

  • Don’t forget about the great tradition of holiday drinks

    Entertaining for the holidays? Here is what you need to prepare some of the more popular traditional holiday cheer, plus a few more.

  • Time to break out the cookie sheets for holiday cookie baking

    How did it get to be December already? I’m just getting over Thanksgiving.
    Did you know December is both National Eggnog and Fruitcake Month?
    If you’ve been to the local Walmart or Belk, you’ll know that the holiday season is in full swing and that means it’s time for baking cookies. So many recipes, so little time…

  • There is a cheese to suit every taste, mood and occasion

    Many varieties of cheese have been developed throughout the world, each with its own special flavor. Although all cheese is made from milk, most of it is made from cow’s milk. Some varieties are also made from the milk of sheep or goats.