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County Extension

  • Thoughts on homemade gifts

     By Cheryle Syracuse

    You don’t need me to tell you that Christmas is getting closer and closer. Many folks still have plans to making and give some homemade or home-baked gifts this year. With that in mind I have two thoughts to share about homemade gifts, one a caution and the other a quick and somewhat healthful idea.

  • Be a healthy host

     By Cheryle Jones Syracuse

    I’m seeing a lot of articles, recipes and ideas about how to stay healthy over the holidays. I wonder: How many people really try to do this? We have an annual brunch for our neighbors and everyone brings something to share. Most often these foods are holiday favorites that get dug out of the recipe box and this is the only time of year they are made, but if you’re trying to eat healthy, sometimes it’s hard to find something to eat amongst the sweets, cheese-laden egg dishes and other goodies.

  • It’s dine-in day

     Cheryle Jones Syracuse

     

    The inaugural Family and Consumer Sciences Day is Wednesday, Dec. 3. In observance of this day, the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences and the National Extension Association for Family and Consumer Sciences are asking families to plan and eat a healthy meal together. They are calling for this to be Dining-in Day.

  • Before and after Thanksgiving

     Cheryle Jones Syracuse

    Family and Consumer Science Staff

    NC Cooperative Extension

    Brunswick County Center

    This is one of those columns that will be printed in the newspaper just before a holiday. I’m guessing that some folks are reading it before Thanksgiving, but others may not get a chance until after the holiday. With that thought in mind, I’m writing both before and after Thanksgiving tips.

    Before

  • It doesn’t have to be another salad

     By Cheryle Jones Syracuse

     

    Eating out has become a part of many of our lives. Although it may be easier to eat more healthfully at home, there are still a variety of ways to eat at a restaurant and eat more healthfully.

    Although vegetables and salads may seem like the answer, they can also be a haven for added fat or sodium. Salad bars can be dangerous. Here are a few tips:

  • Take the holiday challenge

     Cheryle Jones Syracuse

    The food holidays will be here before we know it. Thanksgiving is just around the corner and I don’t need to remind you that about the many eating opportunities that will quickly follow. We make 200 food decisions every day. That’s in a normal day; just think of the decisions you’ll need to make during the holiday time. We can help make some of those food decisions good for you.

  • Eat more beans

     By Cheryle Jones Syracuse

     

    Do you know that game where you’re given a set of words that don’t really sound like they go together and your challenge is to figure out what they have in common? Let’s play. Here are the words: pinto, kidney and black.

    If you don’t know, here are a few more words to give you hints: cranberry, navy, lima, ajzuki, black-eyed, garbanzo, great northern, pink and red.

  • Simple healthful substitutions

     Cheryle Jones Syracuse

     

    For the past month, I’ve been teaching a Heart Healthy cooking class at the training center at N.C. Cooperative Extension Brunswick County Center in Bolivia. I’ve tried to share with class members that healthier foods don’t have to be boring and many of our favorite foods can be prepared in a more healthful manner.

  • Eat better, eat together

     When is the last time you sat down and ate a meal with your family?

    If you can’t remember, you’re not alone. A recent New York Times report said “sitting down to three square meals daily is going by way of the landline” because more and more consumers are snacking and grazing throughout the day. The same article reported that Americans are increasingly likely to eat alone at least 50 percent of the time.

  • Giving excellent praise, part two

     You will recall that we started discussing how we praise kids earlier this month. Excellent praise is: 1) credible, 2) process focused not person focused, 3) specific, and 4) focused on important components. Giving excellent praise supports youth in developing a positive self-concept — the way one perceives oneself. Today, we’ll address the third and fourth components of excellent praise.