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County Extension

  • Sweet potato: the state vegetable

     Cheryle Jones Syracuse

    Family and Consumer Science Staff

    NC Cooperative Extension

    Brunswick County Center

    I just learned something new. The sweet potato is the North Carolina state vegetable. That only seems right since North Carolina is the top sweet potato producing state in the nation. Our farmers grow almost 50 percent of all the sweet potatoes in the United States.

  • Pumpkins everywhere

     I walk with a great group of women in the early morning. Not only do we get an hour of exercise, we keep each other up to date on news and events. Last week’s discussion was pumpkin. It seems the flavor of pumpkin is popping up everywhere at restaurants, coffee shops and grocery stores. My friends are specifically fond of pumpkin coffee, pumpkin donuts and pumpkin coffee creamer.

  • Giving Excellent Praise

     We seem to be having a national discussion on when and how we should praise children. We have “Tiger Moms” who praise rarely to never and parents who praise for accomplishing the simplest tasks. Fortunately, there is a treasure trove of youth development research to help all of us find a place on the spectrum of praise that will support the development of a healthy self-concept in the youth with whom we work. This is the first column of a two-part series on giving praise.

     

  • Stinging caterpillars make appearance in home gardens

     Sam Marshall

    Horticulture Agent

     

  • Eating to lower cholesterol

    For the last couple of weeks, I’ve been sharing information about heart healthy eating and cooking. This week, I’ll continue, since I’m teaching a series of classes on that topic in October and I’ve done a lot of reading on the topic. One area that is a concern to many people, whether you have heart disease or just trying to eat a healthy diet, is cholesterol. This will be the focus in week No. 2 in our class series.

  • Retrieving information from your brain

    By Katie McKee

    Brunswick County 4-H Agent

    Earlier this month, I showed you how concept mapping can be a great tool to MOVE (meaningful, organized, visual, elaborative) information from the fragile working memory to the more rugged long-term memory. Now it’s time to practice the R in MOVE(R): Retrieving it!

  • Triggers that lead to overeating

    In researching materials for our upcoming Heart Healthy cooking classes, I found a great handout that addresses those things that trigger people to overeat. It is part of a program developed by North Carolina Cooperative Extension called “Give Your Heart a Healthy Beat.” The ideas in the handout are so good, I have to share. I think we’ve all heard (or said) some of these at one time or another. If you’re trying to trim down, locate your problem area, etc., maybe there’s a tip here that can help you.

  • Compost year round with worms

    By Sam Marshall

    Horticulture Agent

    Looking for a more cost-effective way to fertilize your lawn or garden? Did you know that almost 75 percent of discarded materials in North Carolina can be composted? Ever considered using earthworms to help you accomplish this task? Composting with earthworms, or vermicomposting, is a highly effective way of turning food and yard waste into nutrient-dense fertilizer that can boost plant health and increase flower and fruit production.

    What is vermicomposting?

  • Get into heart healthy cooking

    During the month of October, the N.C. Cooperative Extension service will be offering a series of classes on heart healthy cooking. Each week will feature a topic related to heart disease and a related food demonstration. Obviously, all of the foods and recipes will be heart healthy. The classes will be held on Thursdays from 1:30to 3:30 p.m. at the Brunswick County Extension Training Center, 25 Referendum Drive at the Government Center in Bolivia.

  • Fall vegetable gardens extend the growing season

    By Patti Schleig

    Master Gardener Volunteer

     

    In a climate suitable for three-season gardening, North Carolina is a great place for gardeners. For those who truly love gardening, I guess you could say it’s utopia. Well, I shouldn’t get carried away, as this utopia includes problems with soil, weather that can change from hour to hour, and insects like none I’ve seen before in gardening. Despite all this, the arrival of fall gives us a break from the headaches of summer and is a great time to reclaim your yard.