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County Extension

  • Compost year round with worms

    By Sam Marshall

    Horticulture Agent

    Looking for a more cost-effective way to fertilize your lawn or garden? Did you know that almost 75 percent of discarded materials in North Carolina can be composted? Ever considered using earthworms to help you accomplish this task? Composting with earthworms, or vermicomposting, is a highly effective way of turning food and yard waste into nutrient-dense fertilizer that can boost plant health and increase flower and fruit production.

    What is vermicomposting?

  • Get into heart healthy cooking

    During the month of October, the N.C. Cooperative Extension service will be offering a series of classes on heart healthy cooking. Each week will feature a topic related to heart disease and a related food demonstration. Obviously, all of the foods and recipes will be heart healthy. The classes will be held on Thursdays from 1:30to 3:30 p.m. at the Brunswick County Extension Training Center, 25 Referendum Drive at the Government Center in Bolivia.

  • Fall vegetable gardens extend the growing season

    By Patti Schleig

    Master Gardener Volunteer

     

    In a climate suitable for three-season gardening, North Carolina is a great place for gardeners. For those who truly love gardening, I guess you could say it’s utopia. Well, I shouldn’t get carried away, as this utopia includes problems with soil, weather that can change from hour to hour, and insects like none I’ve seen before in gardening. Despite all this, the arrival of fall gives us a break from the headaches of summer and is a great time to reclaim your yard.

  • How to MOVE(R) memory

    By Katie McKee

    Brunswick County 4-H Agent

     

  • Fruit and veggie bites: Two food groups that help improve health

    It seems that everyone wants to find that perfect food, the one that’s going to solve all their health problems. I really don’t think there is such a food, but there are two groups of goods that can help improve your health and reduce your risk of chronic disease. What are these foods?

    Yes, you guessed it: fruits and vegetables.

  • Retrieving information from your brain

     Earlier this month, I showed you how concept mapping can be a great tool to MOVE (meaningful, organized, visual, elaborative) information from the fragile working memory to the more rugged long-term memory. Now it’s time to practice the R in MOVE(R): Retrieving it!

  • Looking for that one ‘magic’ food

    I always enjoy looking at the headlines on those popular magazines at the grocery store checkout. It seems that people are always looking for that one food or food group that is the “magic bullet” that will solve all their nutrition and health problems. I think most folks know there isn’t really such a food, but there are some foods that can help eliminate or postpone an illness and you really don’t have to look further than most refrigerators or pantries.

  • Eating to lower cholesterol

     For the last couple of weeks, I’ve been sharing information about heart healthy eating and cooking. This week, I’ll continue, since I’m teaching a series of classes on that topic in October and I’ve done a lot of reading on the topic. One area that is a concern to many people, whether you have heart disease or just trying to eat a healthy diet, is cholesterol. This will be the focus in week No. 2 in our class series.

  • Canning your own homemade salsa

    What do you think about these statements?

    ·      “My salsa is so hot and spicy no bacteria can grow in it.”

    ·      “I’ve added vinegar and lots of tomatoes to my salsa, I don’t need to pressure can it.”

    ·      “It’s my mother’s recipe for salsa; it’s worked in the past. This is how we’ve always done it, I know it’ safe.”

  • Note-taking skills for back to school

    By Katie McKee

     

    Guest Columnist

     

    I have seen learners of all ages scramble to write down every word a teacher said only to leave class with a stack of chaotic notes that do not help with studying later. Implementing a note-taking strategy that uses keywords, questions, notes and summaries will help you focus on relevant information and organize it for studying.