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County Extension

  • Breakfast in a hurry

     Continuing in the quest for quick, easy and nutritious five-ingredient meals, let’s start with breakfast. Of all the meals we eat at home, breakfast may be the most hurried. Before you skip breakfast completely or drive through the nearest fast-food place, consider other options at home.

  • Washing up is important

     Cheryle Jones Syracuse

     

    The older I get, the more Mom was right. If your mom was like mine, she always had you wash your hands before eating. I wish more people would remember what their moms said.

  • A short microwave cooking lesson

     By Cheryle Jones Syracuse

    Microwave ovens are an essential part of most kitchens these days. Yet, for some, they are just expensive coffee warmers, leftover reheaters and popcorn poppers. When microwaves first came out in the 1970s a lot of folks were giving microwave cooking classes. I was one of them. Now they’re like coffee pots in every kitchen and no one ever thinks of taking a class on how to use them. Most people just push a couple of buttons and go. But are you using your microwave to it greatest potential?

  • Thyme to remember

     Cheryle Jones Syracuse

    I was sorting through my spice cupboard looking for some thyme. It got me thinking about that 1960s recording by Simon and Garfunkel. The real name of the song is “Scarborough Fair,” but most of us remember it for the melody line of “parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme.” (I bet you’re humming it right now!)

  • Bring a dish to share

     Cheryle Jones Syracuse

    Family and Consumer Science Staff

    NC Cooperative Extension

    Brunswick County Center

     I think we all have the opportunity to attend potluck or covered dish dinners. You know what I’m talking about…an event where everyone brings a dish to share. But, are you sharing more than the food?

  • What’s in your cupboard?

     At the beginning of the year, I joined a group on Facebook about “decluttering” your house. The idea is great. It’s spells out ideas on what to do each week of the year to help get your home organized. The concept is to do something little every day and by the end of the year your house will be decluttered.

  • Be careful with sprouts

     Cheryle Jones Syracuse

    Sprouts. What is your impression of this food? They could be alfalfa sprouts on a sandwich, mung bean sprouts in a stir-fry or radish sprouts on a salad. Healthful, right? Maybe not.

    While they do contain protein and vitamins, they may also contain something we don’t want. They may also have pathogens that cause foodborne illnesses (most people call this food poisoning).

  • More ideas for portion control

     We hear it all the time. Portions are getting larger and larger. Trying to manage portion size can feel like a constant, impossible task. Every day face we’re faced with huge portions at restaurants and surrounded by oversized packages of processed foods at every turn. It can get overwhelming!

    This may not seem like an earth-shattering point, but so many people think of portion control as deprivation. That’s not it at all! You can control your portions and still feel satisfied — and it’s easier than you think.

  • Winter vegetable soup is perfect for these winter months

     Cheryle Jones Syracuse

    Family and Consumer Science Staff

    NC Cooperative Extension

    Brunswick County Center

    It’s cold and chilly outside. Winter is in full swing, or as I like to think about it, we’re sliding quickly toward spring. But in the meantime, what could sound better than a warming bowl of soup? Plus, many people made health resolutions earlier this month: soup is the perfect resolution food.

  • Do-it-yourself salad dressing

     Cheryle Jones Syracuse 

    In an effort to eat more healthfully in the New Year, are you finding yourself trying to eat more salads? That’s great. Salads can be low in calories and high in fiber while adding some of those important vegetables to your diet, but finding a good salad dressing that isn’t too high in calories, fats or sodium isn’t easy. Reading the nutrition facts labels on commercial salad dressings can really disappoint and discourage even the most healthful eater.