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County Extension

  • Brunswick County to offer Cooperative Extension Master Gardener class

    The Brunswick County Center of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service will offer the Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Program beginning Feb. 5, 2013. The program is designed to teach home gardeners the basics of horticulture for coastal North Carolina.

  • ’Tis the frosty season

    By Charlotte Glen
    Horticulture Agent
    Pender County Cooperative Extension

    Most of our area saw its first frost last weekend…right on schedule. The first frost of fall typically occurs during the first week of November in southeastern coastal North Carolina.
    With frost, many plants stop growing, changing the gardener’s palette of gardening chores. The following tips will keep you on task in your southern yard and garden this fall.
    Houseplants

  • Doggy bag safety and advice for other leftovers

    I love doggy bags. We don’t have a dog and most of the time those leftovers are for me.
    With the size of many restaurant portions these days, it is only wise to bring part of your food home for another meal or possibly two. Have you ever thought about the safety of this food? Here’s a quick one-question quiz to see what you know about doggy bag safety.
    The last time you took home a doggy bag from a restaurant, how long did it stay in your refrigerator before eating it?
    A: One day.
    B: Two days.
    C: Three to four days.

  • Local 4-H’ers go to state conference

    4-H’ers from across North Carolina joined Brunswick County 4-H Teen Council representatives Kenan Bridges, Camille Carr and Sammi Lawrence at the 2012 State 4-H Council Conference in Raleigh on Nov. 3-4.
    They participated in leadership and skill building workshops, district council and state council board meetings, heard speakers, competed for the 4-H Spirit Stick and also enjoyed dances and other fun evening activities.

  • Go beyond red this year when choosing holiday poinsettias

    By Tom Woods
    Agricultural Technician

  • Watching your waist during the holidays can be challenging

    Many people gain 1-5 pounds each year between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. That may not seem too bad, but the long-term problem is that most people who gain weight during the holidays never manage to return to their pre-holiday weight in the new year. Year after year, this adds up.
    Research has shown (and I’m sure that many of you know from personal experience) this can be a difficult time to try to lose weight. So this year, instead of focusing on weight loss, set a goal of staying at the weight you are right now.

  • Caring for living Christmas trees

    By Charlotte Glen
    Pender County Horticulture Agent
    Many garden centers offer rosemary plants pruned in the shape of Christmas trees. Following the holidays, these hardy shrubs can be planted in the landscape and enjoyed for years to come.
    In addition to pre-cut Fraser firs, many garden centers offer living trees grown in containers for sale as Christmas trees. If you are tempted to buy one of these to use both for holiday decoration and as a permanent addition to your landscape, keep the following tips in mind to ensure your tree has long and healthy life.

  • It’s time to freeze some cranberries

    I bet there are cranberries in your house right now. Cranberries are a must for most families at Thanksgiving.
    What’s your favorite way to serve them? For some, it has got to be the jellied cranberry sauce…complete with those little ridges straight from the can. Other families look forward to a sauce made with fresh whole cranberries and oranges, or maybe you prefer a special jelled cranberry mold.

  • Gardeners offer tips on holiday gifts

    By Tom Woods and Sharon Dowdy

    Newspapers are filled with holiday ads. Wrapping paper and decorations appear on department store shelves. The holiday will soon be here. If your gift-giving list includes a gardener, take some advice from a few of Brunswick County’s most experienced gardeners.

  • Five tips to stretch your food dollars

    Before heading to the grocery store, plan your meals for the week. Include meals like stews, casseroles or stir-fries, which “stretch” expensive items into more portions. Check to see what foods you already have and make a list for what you need to buy.
    Locate the “unit price” on the shelf directly below the product. Use it to compare different brands and different sizes of the same brand to determine which is more economical.