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County Extension

  • Consider a fall vegetable garden

    By Sam Marshall

     

    Fall is an exciting time in southeastern North Carolina! We finally get a reprieve from the heat and humidity and the bugs are more tolerable, which means you can begin to reclaim the outdoors and get back in the garden. Now is the time to start a fall vegetable garden. If you typically grow a summer garden — tomatoes, beans, cucumbers, squash — and no fall garden, you are only getting half the production potential from your beds and are missing out on some tasty cool-season veggies.

     

  • Enjoy fresh local corn while you can

    Truly one of the great tastes of summer is sweet corn-on-the-cob. There’s still time to enjoy it this year. I’ve been told by local farm markets they will have corn well into September.  

  • Achieving higher levels of gardening consciousness
  • What about five a day?

    Five a day? Can you do better? How about doubling that amount?

  • Casting shade in the garden

    One of the best ways to beat the heat in the garden is to cast a little shade on the situation. Not only will you make things more pleasant, you’ll also save 25 percent or so on your home cooling costs if that shade tree is located properly.

  • What’s a healthy snack bar?

    I bet you have one or two in your purse, briefcase, car or gym bag. What am I talking about? A snack bar or energy bar of some sort. Prepackaged and ready-to-go bars are popular for busy people to grab and take with them. But the question is, are these any better for you than a candy bar?

  • Watering responsibly in the summer

     

     By Sam Marshall

     

  • Get gluten

    Got gluten? Maybe you should.

    Gluten-free diets are popular these days despite the lack of evidence they are healthful for most people. If you’re trying to go gluten-free, you may want to give it a second thought. A recent article by Lisa C. Andrews, MEd, RD, LD in Food and Health Communications reports on a new study that suggest that going gluten-free may actually raise your risk for type 2 diabetes.

  • Cookout safety

    I recently went to a large family reunion where there were lots of hamburgers being cooked on grills. Was there a food thermometer in sight? Nope. USDA advises us to use a food thermometer to accurately measure if meat is cooked to a high enough internal temperature to destroy any harmful bacteria that may cause a foodborne illness. This means on the grill, too. Many folks are not in the habit of using these tools and they are easily forgotten when packing for a picnic or cooking outside.

  • Killing and controlling the spread of chamberbitter

    Jim Gregory, a local resident and retired N.C. State forestry professor, sent me a note about a plant that he calls “niruri.” If you are into plant Latin, it’s Phyllanthus urinaria. In South America and Asia, this plant grows into a small shrub used to make an herbal remedy for kidney stones. “Niruri” literally means “break stone” in Spanish.