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County Extension

  • Don’t give up on ground pearls

    By Tom Woods
    Agricultural Technician

  • ‘A Civil War Story’ plays at Maritime Museum

    The North Carolina Maritime Museum at Southport will showcase authentic North Carolina culture and heritage on Saturday, July 14, in the second installment of the popular three-part summer program Second Saturdays.

  • During summer, container plants may need water daily

    Growing plants in containers is one of my favorite ways to garden and it can bring instant rewards. When the temperatures increase, plants seem to go into a growing frenzy. If they do not have access to water and nutrients, they become stressed and unhealthy looking. Watering is a bit of a balancing act. Trying to determine how much and how often can be quite a challenge.
    My strategy is to water containers thoroughly when the soil surface becomes dry to the touch. This can become tricky, depending on the soil used in the container.

  • How to build a rain garden

    By Tom Woods
    Master Gardener

  • Red, white and blueberries

    July belongs to blueberries. It is National Blueberry Month and a great time to think and talk about this super food.
    Nutritionally, we’ve been hearing a lot about blueberries lately. People are calling them a super food and not just because they taste good. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), blueberries are near the top of the list when it comes to antioxidant activity per serving.

  • Palms in the landscape create a tropical escape

    Planting palms in the landscape can create a tropical escape and drastically change the look of a garden.
    Even though palms do not have a showy flower, their large, evergreen leaves are natural attention getters. A single large palm or a grove of smaller palms can serve as a focal point for any landscape, large or small.
    Palms can be shrubs or trees. Most palms form some kind of woody trunk, but a palm trunk is different from the trunk of an ordinary tree. Palms rarely form branches, but keep their leaves clustered at the end of the trunk.

  • 4-H’er attends Raleigh program

    Brunswick County 4-H member Sammi Lawrence attended 4-H Citizenship North Carolina Focus in Raleigh on June 11-13. She returned home from three days where more than 200 youth and adults representing more than 75 4-H programs across the state gathered to exchange ideas, gain knowledge and learn through hands-on experiences about the different levels and branches of government.

  • Learn to identify many poisonous plants

    Tom Woods
    Horticultural Technician
    Some of the plants in your garden and in your home are more than just pretty; they may also be poisonous if ingested. It is wise to be aware of the plants that can cause harm, especially if you have children or pets on the premises.
    One of the prime rules is to avoid any white fruits, both in the northern part of the country and in the tropics.

  • Local seafood is plentiful at the coast

    "When you’re lucky enough to live by the ocean, you’re lucky enough.”
    We have all heard this saying or seen it on one of those cute little signs at the gift stores, but it certainly applies to those of us who live in Brunswick County. Not only are we lucky to have our wonderful beaches and amazing ocean, we have access to great local seafood.

  • Senior horticulture team wins

    The Brunswick County Senior 4-H Horticulture Judging Team of Darby Dawkins, Carlyn Clark, Tori Norris and Camden Clark won first place in the North Carolina statewide horticulture judging competition at North Carolina State University in Raleigh on May 19. Dawkins also accrued the highest individual score.
    The Horticulture Judging Competition entailed three components: 1. Judging the quality of horticulture products (plants, flowers, fruits and vegetables); 2. Identification of 100 plants; and 3. A written test on horticultural practices.