County Extension

  • Now is the time to plant trees

    Tom Woods
    Agricultural Technician

  • Parents can set limits on TV watching, video games

    In last week’s column, I wrote about September being “National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month.” One of the big things people are talking about on this subject is the need for people of all ages (but especially children) to get more physical activity.
    Physical activity is an important part of a healthy lifestyle. It helps control weight, builds muscle, reduces fat, promotes strong bones, muscle and joint development and decreases the risk of obesity.

  • Cattle owners may vote on referendum

    All cattle owners in North Carolina are invited to vote on the state’s Cattle Industry Assessment Referendum on Thursday, Oct. 4.
    The N.C. Cattlemen’s Association requested and was granted permission from the N.C. Board of Agriculture to conduct a referendum to continue the assessment and voting will take place at the Cooperative Extension office in each county.

  • Local students win 4-H scholarships

    Students from across the state have received 4-H scholarships from the North Carolina 4-H Development Fund to attend institutions of higher learning.
    The foundation has awarded 76 scholarships to students from 45 of North Carolina’s 100 counties, including one in Brunswick County.
    Kendrick Morgan, 20, son of Lonnie Mitchell Jr. and Darrilyn Morgan of Shallotte, received the Edward Gore/General Hugh Shelton 4-H Renewable Leadership Scholarship. He currently is attending N.C. State University, where he is studying sociology.

  • Curbing childhood obesity

    This is a sad statistic: One out of every three American children is already overweight or obese.
    September is National Childhood Obesity Month, a time designated to bring further awareness to this problem and encourage action.
    In the past four decades, obesity rates in the United States have soared among all age groups. This rise in obesity has affected our youth in alarming fashion. More than 23 million children and teenagers in the United States ages 2-19 are obese or overweight, a statistic that health and medical experts consider an epidemic.

  • Growing great evergreens for screens and hedges

    Tom Woods
    Agricultural Technician
    Story by Charlotte Glenn
    Need some privacy? Want to screen out the view into your neighbor’s yard? Consider planting a living fence of evergreen shrubs, but look beyond the common disease-plagued Leyland Cypress! Local garden centers carry many evergreens suitable for screening…and fall is the perfect time to plant.

  • 4-H’ers take part in dairy event

    During the month of July, a group a 4-H’ers took a trip to N.C. State’s dairy facilities. The young campers, along with their leaders, had the opportunity to learn about the campus’ own source of dairy products.

  • Finding holiday recipes online

    I know it’s early in the season, but it seems once kids are back in school and Labor Day has passed, people begin to think about those winter holidays. I had a couple phone calls and email requests about making homemade canned products for Christmas gifts.
    Please beware—while numerous recipes circulate on the Internet, in recipe blogs, and on television shows, not all of them are safe.
    Canning chocolate sauce

  • As summer winds down, turn to your turf

    By Tom Woods
    Horticultural Technician

    The following information is courtesy of Charlotte Glen, Pender County Cooperative Extension horticultural agent.
    When areas of your lawn that were healthy in the fall fail to green up and grow right away in the spring, cold damage (often referred to as winter kill) is the likely culprit. Minimize winterkill in your lawn by applying potassium fertilizer and raising your mowing height this month.

  • We’re going bananas—to the tune of 27 pounds of them per year

    I know the buzz word with food these days is “local.” For most items, that’s a great goal; however, there are some foods that just can’t be grown close to home. One popular food that fits into this category is the banana.
    It’s estimated the average American eats about 27 pounds of bananas a year. More than 96 percent of us buy bananas at least once a month. Why not? You don’t have to wash them or cook them and they are easy to take with you for a quick snack or dessert at any time.