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County Extension

  • Teen TiLT volunteers needed

    Are you a teen between the ages of 13-18? Do you enjoy leading and teaching children 5-12 years of age? Do you take pride in your county and want to find ways to help? Do you enjoy being involved with other peers that have the same common goal: to grow in leadership, citizenship, learn new life skills and share what you learn with others? Are you interested in growing your volunteer hours for college, job searches and scholarship opportunities?
    If you have answered yes to one or more of these questions, TiLT might be for you.

  • A healthy to-do list

    Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension
    Brunswick County Center
    Tis the season for lists: to-do lists, gift lists, wish lists and guest lists. Unfortunately, most holiday lists lack time for regular nourishing meals and physical activity.
    Just when we need them the most, we are too busy for these basic healthy habits. Sadly, many people seem to throw “caution to the wind” during the holiday season and deal with the consequences in January or later.

  • Some ways to make your own bee-friendly garden

    Judy Koehly
    Master Gardener
    When most people think of bees, the first bee that comes to mind is the honeybee, but this bee is only one of about 25,000 species known worldwide. In the U.S., we have almost 4,000 types of pollinating bees.
    The honeybee was adopted as North Carolina’s state insect in 1973. Not a native species, the honeybee was brought to North America by settlers from Europe. Bees native to the Carolinas are solitary bees and not subject to colony collapse.

  • PodPonics is an unusual approach to urban farming

    The local food movement is on the rise. I recently went to a sustainable agriculture conference and was introduced to our next generation of farmers. These young adults are a diverse group, full of energy and interested in implementing new ideas and techniques into the farming world.
    Nearly every aspect of our lives has seen a vast change over the last few decades. Yet the way we grow our food seems to be the one thing that has failed to evolve much at all.

  • Now’s the time to talk (leftover) turkey

    Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension
    Brunswick County Center
    By the time most of you are reading this, another Thanksgiving dinner will be just a memory, photos posted on Facebook and a sad looking turkey carcass chilling out in the refrigerator.
    It’s all over but the leftovers, but that doesn’t mean it’s time to forget about food safety. While overindulging can cause an upset stomach, so can eating food that was improperly handled or stored.

  • Junior gardeners earn certification

    Eight members of the Merry Gold Gardeners Junior Master Gardeners 4H Club have received the Golden Ray Certification for Growing a Vegetable Garden. Led by Grace Wrigley and Mercy McCurdy, certified Master Gardeners, the club meets at Supply Elementary School during the school year to learn more about gardening and the environment.
    To learn more about Brunswick County 4-H and how to participate in activities like these, contact Blair Green, 4-H extension agent, at blair_wooten@ncsu.edu or Angie Lawrence, 4-H program assistant, at angie_lawrence@ncsu.edu.

  • Cover crops give back to your soil

    People garden for many reasons.
    When we garden, we are almost always focused on what is going on above the ground and think little about what is going on in the soil.

  • Big business and bees

    Judy Kohley
    Master Gardener
    As individuals, we can help bees in a number of ways: plant flowers that bees love, stop using pesticides, and, become beekeepers. Cross-pollination by bees helps at least 30 percent of the world’s crops and 90 percent of wild plants to thrive. Without bees, many plants, including food crops, would die off.

  • Only the turkey should be stuffed

    Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension
    Brunswick County Center
    Many people gain one to five pounds each year between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. That may not seem too bad, but the long-term problem is most people who gain weight during the holidays never manage to return to their pre-holiday weight in the new year. Year after year, this adds up.

  • Master Gardeners complete Ocean Trail community project

    In February, a group of interested gardeners enrolled in the Brunswick County Master Gardener class, which required a community project upon completion of the course. This year, 19 Master Gardener interns donated time to upgrade the secret garden at the Ocean Trail Health Care and Rehabilitation Center in Southport.
    Melanie Long and her staff take pride in offering opportunities to enhance the quality of life for residents. After the secret garden project drew to an end, the Master Gardeners still had money left from all the generous donations throughout the county.