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County Extension

  • Cover crops give back to your soil

    People garden for many reasons.
    When we garden, we are almost always focused on what is going on above the ground and think little about what is going on in the soil.

  • Big business and bees

    Judy Kohley
    Master Gardener
    As individuals, we can help bees in a number of ways: plant flowers that bees love, stop using pesticides, and, become beekeepers. Cross-pollination by bees helps at least 30 percent of the world’s crops and 90 percent of wild plants to thrive. Without bees, many plants, including food crops, would die off.

  • Only the turkey should be stuffed

    Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension
    Brunswick County Center
    Many people gain one to five pounds each year between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. That may not seem too bad, but the long-term problem is most people who gain weight during the holidays never manage to return to their pre-holiday weight in the new year. Year after year, this adds up.

  • Master Gardeners complete Ocean Trail community project

    In February, a group of interested gardeners enrolled in the Brunswick County Master Gardener class, which required a community project upon completion of the course. This year, 19 Master Gardener interns donated time to upgrade the secret garden at the Ocean Trail Health Care and Rehabilitation Center in Southport.
    Melanie Long and her staff take pride in offering opportunities to enhance the quality of life for residents. After the secret garden project drew to an end, the Master Gardeners still had money left from all the generous donations throughout the county.

  • Take action on pond maintenance this fall

    Water gardens are becoming a popular addition to any landscape. They require maintenance throughout the year. Preparation for the winter months is especially important for the survival of aquatic plants and the wildlife in and around the pond. Debris such as leaves and dying plants must be removed, especially if there are fish in the pond.

  • Disease problems are homegrown

    Tom Woods
    Master Gardener
    Beautiful plants often don’t live up to their potential. Getting to the root of problems like disease and wilt sometimes starts with a look in the mirror, says University of Georgia experts.

  • Volunteers honored for work with museum, planetarium

    Volunteers at the Museum of Coastal Carolina and Ingram Planetarium were honored on Oct. 25 at the annual volunteer recognition luncheon at the museum, attended by more than 85 volunteers. Special awards were presented to the following individuals for their outstanding service during the past year:
    Museum Volunteer of the Year: Cookie Rance; Planetarium Volunteer of the Year: John Misiaszek; Volunteer Lifetime Achievement: Sue McCann; Museum Rookie of the Year: Anne Neely; and Planetarium Rookies of the Year: Amy and Alex Sludds.

  • County Extension briefs

    Master Gardeners plan classes
    The Master Gardeners of Brunswick County offer a unique horticulture class for Brunswick County residents. The class provides the basic knowledge needed to maintain a yard/garden in coastal North Carolina.

  • More than just fried green tomatoes

    Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension
    Brunswick County Center

  • Controlling fire ants

    Tom Woods
    Master Gardener
    Fire ants can ruin picnics and football games. Treating fire ant colonies in the fall can help edge out future colonies, lessening the likelihood they’ll steal your chips or nip at your toes.
    Fire ant colonies have been growing through the summer and have reached their peak size. Attacking those colonies now will help next spring when they start to swarm again. Fire ants are easier to kill in the fall for four main reasons: