.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

County Extension

  • Invasive plants upset balance and have the potential to spread everywhere

    Have you ever taken a walk through the woods and noticed the same invasive plant covering the entire ground? Why do some weeds thrive so well that it seems they could take over the world?
    Some common invasive species you may be familiar with are kudzu, wisteria, privet, ivy, and even Bradford pears. Small forest openings, forest road right of ways, and areas under and beside forest canopies are often occupied by invasive non-native plants. If you live near one of these spaces, you may be battling noxious weeds.

  • Fighting fall webworms

    Tom Woods
    Master Gardener

  • Make a living wreath for a holiday centerpiece

    When I first heard the term “living wreath,” I didn’t quite understand what that meant until I had an opportunity to see one. Of all the container gardens one can choose from, the succulent wreaths are among the most beautiful. It may take a little work to create one of these, but when you finish, you will have a living work of art.

  • Listeria—keeping fresh foods safe

    Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension,
    Brunswick County Center

  • Controlling aphids in the vegetable garden

    Tom Woods
    Master Gardener

  • Eat your jack-o-lantern

    Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension Service
    Brunswick County Center

  • Divide perennials in fall for free flowers next year

    It can be expensive to keep purchasing plants for empty spots in the landscape. I just happen to be fond of perennials, which is a huge benefit because they can be divided to make more plants for vacant locations in the garden.
    When dividing perennials, timing and technique are important. Perennial plants are healthiest and most productive when they are young and have room to spread. Here are a few techniques to follow when dividing perennials in your garden:

  • Tips for a safe kitchen

    Myra Burgess
    Family Nutrition Program Assistant
    Expanded Foods and Nutrition Program
    •Never put a glass casserole or lid on the stove or over a burner. If it gets hot and explodes, it will send shards of glass in all directions.
    •Keep your knives sharpened. They will work more efficiently and you will be less likely to cut yourself. If you drop a knife, stand back, and please do not try to catch it.
    •Use an appropriate cutting surface and always cut away from yourself.

  • Beware of poisonous snakes in North Carolina

    I moved to Brunswick County last year and I have seen more poisonous snakes in the last three weeks than I ever saw the entire time I lived in Raleigh.
    Snakes are seen most often in the spring and fall as they search for food or move to and from hibernation areas. North Carolina snakes, in general, emerge in late March or early April and go into hibernation in October.
    Most land snakes are much more active at night. Most people are bitten while trying to kill or handle a snake. Snakes are often frightened by people and try to move quickly in the opposite direction.

  • Become a food gardener: Grow your favorite vegetables in the fall

    Tom Woods
    Master Gardener
    If excessive heat and drought ruined your summer garden or, like me, prevented you from planting one, now is the time for your second chance.
    Many favorite vegetables can be planted over the next month for harvest throughout the fall and into winter. What’s more, FoodGardener, a new email service from Pender Cooperative Extension, will increase your chances of success by keeping you up to date on when and how to plant as well as how to sustainably manage garden pests.
    Fall Vegetable Gardening