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County Extension

  • Don’t throw out those old recipes; rethink them

    Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension
    Brunswick County Center
    Holidays are the time for traditions, with foods being some of the favorite traditions of all. This may be the only time of year that some favorite family recipes are prepared. Although we love to use grandma or great-grandma’s recipes, it may be time to rethink and update some of the ingredients.

  • Dream becomes reality with hard work

    4-H has always prided itself for imparting knowledge to youth that helps them develop life skills and become productive members of society.
    In 2006, Elizabeth Mintz participated in the N.C. State Fair Youth Market Turkey Program through the help of her local 4-H office. In May of that year, she received four turkey poults that were less than two days old. She raised them until the state fair rolled into town and presented her best bird for competition, where she placed 14th in her class.

  • Interesting edibles for the garden

    There are plenty of vegetables you can grow in your garden, and not all of them are annuals. Imagine growing vegetables that require just about the same amount of care as the flowers in your perennial beds and borders­—no annual tilling and planting. They thrive and produce abundant and nutritious crops throughout the season.
    It sounds too good to be true, but there are underappreciated plants that could be used for this purpose. Perennial vegetables are perfect as part of an edible landscape plan or permaculture garden.

  • 4-H trains leaders in county

    Ten Brunswick County residents took part in 4-H Club leader training at Bethel AME Church in Leland on Friday, Nov. 10.
    Debra Knox, media coordinator at Lincoln Elementary, started recruiting a 4-H youth leader team in July. In October, she turned in eight volunteer applications and set up training with the 4-H staff.

  • Separate your foods

    Myra Burgess
    Family Nutrition Program Assistant
    Expanded Foods & Nutrition Program
    Brunswick County Cooperative Extension

  • Teen TiLT volunteers needed

    Are you a teen between the ages of 13-18? Do you enjoy leading and teaching children 5-12 years of age? Do you take pride in your county and want to find ways to help? Do you enjoy being involved with other peers that have the same common goal: to grow in leadership, citizenship, learn new life skills and share what you learn with others? Are you interested in growing your volunteer hours for college, job searches and scholarship opportunities?
    If you have answered yes to one or more of these questions, TiLT might be for you.

  • A healthy to-do list

    Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension
    Brunswick County Center
    Tis the season for lists: to-do lists, gift lists, wish lists and guest lists. Unfortunately, most holiday lists lack time for regular nourishing meals and physical activity.
    Just when we need them the most, we are too busy for these basic healthy habits. Sadly, many people seem to throw “caution to the wind” during the holiday season and deal with the consequences in January or later.

  • Some ways to make your own bee-friendly garden

    Judy Koehly
    Master Gardener
    When most people think of bees, the first bee that comes to mind is the honeybee, but this bee is only one of about 25,000 species known worldwide. In the U.S., we have almost 4,000 types of pollinating bees.
    The honeybee was adopted as North Carolina’s state insect in 1973. Not a native species, the honeybee was brought to North America by settlers from Europe. Bees native to the Carolinas are solitary bees and not subject to colony collapse.

  • PodPonics is an unusual approach to urban farming

    The local food movement is on the rise. I recently went to a sustainable agriculture conference and was introduced to our next generation of farmers. These young adults are a diverse group, full of energy and interested in implementing new ideas and techniques into the farming world.
    Nearly every aspect of our lives has seen a vast change over the last few decades. Yet the way we grow our food seems to be the one thing that has failed to evolve much at all.

  • Now’s the time to talk (leftover) turkey

    Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension
    Brunswick County Center
    By the time most of you are reading this, another Thanksgiving dinner will be just a memory, photos posted on Facebook and a sad looking turkey carcass chilling out in the refrigerator.
    It’s all over but the leftovers, but that doesn’t mean it’s time to forget about food safety. While overindulging can cause an upset stomach, so can eating food that was improperly handled or stored.