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County Extension

  • Creating sustainable landscaping

    Millions of dollars are spent each year designing, implementing and maintaining our landscapes. Unfortunately, long-term problems are caused when we as gardeners make decisions based on our needs and wants without considering the environmental impact. You may have heard the term sustainable landscaping. What does a sustainable landscape mean? 

  • 4-H has annual achievement banquet

    More than 80 4-H members, parents, volunteers and Extension staff were in attendance to celebrate accomplishments the youth have made during 2010 at the annual Brunswick County 4-H achievement banquet on Feb. 21 at the Extension Office.

    This year, the 4-H’ers were honored as the shining stars in 4-H. 

    The room sparkled with twinkling lights and a donated, custom-made starlight “chandelier” hung in the middle of the room. 

  • Firewise landscaping in North Carolina

    In 1993, a wildfire in a dry canyon of Laguna Beach, Ca., raced toward hundreds of nearby homes, giving residents little warning. More than 14,000 acres and 440 homes went up in flames. In a nearby neighborhood, 286 homes were totally destroyed. One home was left standing in the midst of hundreds of piles of ash. Why did this one home survive? The surviving house was built with fire prevention in mind and it worked. 

  • Native plants: What grows here?

    Native plants are those that were growing in a particular area prior to European settlement. North Carolina has a wide variety of native plants because of our diverse landscape of coastal plains, swamps, piedmonts and mountain areas.

    Native plants aren’t just for people who have acreage to devote to restoring prairies. There are many reasons to consider using native plants in your home landscape. 

  • Choose vegetables with maximum nutrition

    There are two important vegetable facts to remember: 1) They are packed with great taste and good nutrition; and 2) few Americans get the full benefit of vegetable nutrition, because most of us do not eat enough. 

    Kids need a cup of veggies a day, while adults need 2-1/2 to 3 cups daily. Get some vegetable power in your life by trying them a variety of forms. 

    Choose fresh vegetables

  • Food safety class to be offered beginning March 21

    Learn the right techniques for handling, preparing, serving and storing foods safely during the ServSafe Food Safety for Restaurant Managers class offered in four sessions on March 21, 28, April 4 and April 11 at the Training Center in the Cooperative Extension building (Building N) at the Government Center in Bolivia.

    The four-hour classroom sessions will begin at 12:30 p.m. each day. Participation is required at all four sessions. 

  • Use worms to turn scraps into compost

    Use worms to turn your kitchen scraps into a rich crumbly compost that when added to soil will boost plant health and growth.

    Composting your kitchen scraps not only keeps them out of the landfill, it also provides an excellent soil amendment and natural fertilizer that will improve your soil, boost plant growth and increase plant drought tolerance and pest resistance. 

  • Family Nutrition: Plan, shop and enjoy

    Nutrition experts agree that vibrant, brightly colored, whole foods are often the healthiest choices as wells best bargains in the grocery store. They tend to be nutrient-rich, meaning that more nutrition is packed into every calorie. 

    On the other hand, processed and packaged foods tend to have more fat, sodium, and added sugars (with bright artificial colors rather than natural goodness). These items also tend to cost more because you pay for fancy packaging and advertising. 

  • The benefits of turf and turf management

    I just finished taking a weeklong class offered once a year at North Carolina State University on turf management. I have always been one of those gardeners who would prefer planting beds and flowers instead of a nice green lawn. I honestly have a new appreciation for turf after this course.

  • How to select container plants

    In late winter and early spring, garden centers are receiving their new plant material. When you go to the garden center, how do you decide what to buy, given so many choices and so many types?

    The first thing to do is check out the label that is attached to the plant. This will indicate the hardiness zone, mature size of the plant, sun and shade requirements and what the watering requirements are for this particular plant.