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County Extension

  • How does the canning process preserve food?

    So you want to try canning fresh vegetable and fruits this summer? You’ll be ahead of the game if you spend a little time understanding how canning preserves food for later use. The high percentage of water in most fresh foods makes them very perishable. They spoil or lose their quality for several reasons: 

  • There are organic pesticide alternatives

  • Growing veggies organically the easy way

    Judy Koehly 

    Master Gardener

  • What to do when nematodes appear on your plants

    A gentleman walked into the Extension office with a sample of a compacta holly that was struggling to survive. I immediately suspected it could be root-knot nematodes because compacta hollies are extremely susceptible to this roundworm. He collected a sample, sent it to the NCDA and sure enough, his soil tested positive for nematodes.
    Soils usually contain many free-living, or non-plant-parasitic, as well as plant-parasitic nematodes. Often, several genera of plant parasites are present in the same soil, though only one or two may cause major plant damage.

  • Dust off the canning equipment

    In an effort to cut grocery costs, help the family budget and take advantage of fresh, local foods, more people are turning to food preservation this summer. Many people are digging out long-neglected equipment and recipes to do-it-themselves.
    The advantages of home canning are lost when inappropriate or unsafe equipment or procedures are used. Why risk the loss of time and produce and possibly make yourself or a family member sick by using an unsafe gauge or out-of-date or untested recipes or procedures?

  • 13-year cicadas ready for their day in the sun

    April Reese Sorrow
    University of Georgia
    In a few weeks, we will have the chance to see a rare natural phenomenon: the emergence of Brood 19, our only 13-year cicada.
    “For 13 years, these cicada nymphs have been living below ground, awaiting their day in the sun,” said Nancy Hinkle, an entomologist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

  • Color in the garden: It soon will be time to plant annuals

     The weather keeps playing tricks on us, but soon enough, it will be time to plant those beloved annuals. So what is the difference between an annual and a perennial? The biggest difference between the two is how long they live, when they bloom and how they develop their root systems.

  • Milk and vitamins: What’s a parent to do?

     

     

     

     

  • Understanding colony collapse and the loss of honeybees

    Many of you have heard about the decline in our bee populations and are concerned. You should be concerned. I found this University of Georgia Cooperative Extension article informative. 

    Nearly 30 percent of all honeybees literally disappeared last winter, fleeing their hives never to return. Researchers have studied colony collapse disorder since it was identified in 2006. They are now uncovering answers to this problem.

  • Bits-n-Boots has fun day

    Bits-n-Boots, the newly chartered Brunswick County 4-H Horse Club, hosted its first club fun day recently. In addition to the nearly 20 club members and four volunteer club leaders, four breeds of horses were exhibited, including the American Paint Horse, Appaloosa, Shetland pony and an Arabian.