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County Extension

  • Moles and voles are on the rise

    Mole problems seem to be on the rise. Tunnels and more tunnels everywhere you turn, what can be done? How can we control these critters? First, we must be sure it is indeed a mole and not a vole.

    Moles have a hairless, pointed snout that extends out one-half inch in front of the mouth, tiny eyes and no external ears. Their large paddle-like forefeet and sharp claws enable the mole to swim through the soil. 

  • 4-H students learn about robotics

    Brunswick County 4-H needs help identifying adults who want to spend a few hours each month with youth learning about robotics in a 4-H club setting in the Southport/Oak Island area. The current club leaders are unable to continue serving, but there is still a lot of interest among members to carry on the club.

    Robotics provides hands-on experiences in designing, programming and building robots using Lego MindStorms Robotics kits and RoboLab software. The club won second place in robot design at the Robotics Kickoff competition this year.

  • County to publish Green Pages

    Looking for an inexpensive way to market your horticulture business? Be a part of the updated Brunswick County Green Pages, a publication of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service listing businesses providing products and services to the people of Brunswick County.

    If you sell plants and garden supplies, lawn mowers and other equipment, market fruits and vegetables, or provide landscape installation and maintenance services, don’t miss this opportunity.

  • Winter watering: Plants need less now than in summer

    By Judy Koehly 
    Master Gardener

    Plants don’t need as much care in winter as they do in summer, but it is important not to neglect watering your plants over the winter. Some ice or wind damage is unavoidable, but a lot of cold weather damage to plants’ cells is caused by dehydration. In our region, normal winter precipitation is enough for plants because their cold weather watering needs are considerably less; however, making sure your plants have adequate hydration is the best way to protect them harsh weather.

  • What to keep or get rid of in your landscape

    Winter is a good time to think about renovating your landscape. It is easier to see the bare bones of the garden without the distraction of foliage or blooms. It is always wise to keep some of the plants in an established landscape. That way you can still provide habitats for wildlife and reduce erosion. The trick is in knowing which plants to keep. Here are a few guidelines to help you sift through all your botanical choices.

  • Since it’s Heart Month be good to your heart

    Ah, February! It’s that sweet time of year when our thoughts turn to roses, romance and chocolate. 

    American Heart Month is also a wonderful time to appreciate the daily beat of your own heart and to renew your personal commitment to taking care of it. If you have neglected that important organ a little more than you should have this past year, these tips will get you back on track. 

    Limit unhealthy fats 

  • Bring springtime inside this winter with bulbs

    Thanks to Sharon Dowdy of the University of Georgia for the following information:

    Flowering bulbs typically herald the coming of spring. By using a technique called “forcing” you can enjoy many springtime bulbs during the winter, too.

    “My first Christmas in Ringold, Ga., I bought amaryllis bulbs and had a contest with the ladies in the Extension office,” said Charles Lancaster, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent in Catoosa County. “I bought bulbs in four colors, and we each picked one.” 

  • Cook once, but you can eat twice

    Do you struggle to figure out what to prepare for dinner on a daily basis? Is the evening meal just one more thing added to your already busy schedule? Give yourself a break by trying the technique of  “cook once, eat twice.”

  • Preparing your veggie garden for spring

    I received a call from a consumer the other day wanting to know what he could do out in the garden this time of year. People usually don’t start getting the “garden bug” until the weather warms up a bit. I told him one of the tasks he could work on is preparing the vegetable garden for spring planting.

  • A weed you want in your landscape

    By TOM WOODS
    MASTER GARDENER

    Butterfly weed is one weed you want in your landscape. It’s a butterfly magnet. The leaves are the preferred food source for the larvae of several species of butterflies, including Monarchs and the flowers provide nectar for both butterflies and hummingbirds.