.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

County Extension

  • Early spring expected to be warm and dry

    North Carolina will likely experience a warmer-than-normal and drier-than-normal winter and early spring. Heating demand for this winter should be much less than last winter. Unfortunately, recharge of soil moisture, groundwater, streams and reservoirs will probably also be less than normal.

    Climatological winter begins Dec. 1. Climatological spring begins March 1.

    El Niño-Southern Oscillation, or ENSO, ocean-atmosphere patterns have a major impact on North Carolina’s winter and spring climate. 

  • Turf management can be done in February

    Bermudagrass

    Mowing: Mow overseeded bermudagrass at one-inch before the grass gets taller than one and one-half inches. Recycle nutrients by not collecting the clippings unless they accumulate heavily on the surface. Dormant bermudagrass that has not been overseeded need not be mowed. 

  • Portion distortion and food control

    Q

    uality or quantity? Which do you choose when it comes to food? 

    Ever eaten at a restaurant that brings you huge quantities of food that is pretty mediocre on the taste scale? We often leave those places talking about how much food we were served or how much food we were able to bring home for another meal and what a bargain it was. 

    Try changing your way of thinking and enjoy smaller quantities of food that is deliciously prepared with high-quality, fresh ingredients.

  • Now is the time to prune crape myrtles

    Late January to early March is the time to do needed pruning on tree form crape myrtles. The important concept here is “needed” pruning; we aren’t going to dwell on the barbaric practice of topping these beautiful plants. 

    If you have a size problem with a crape myrtle, this is the time to think about removing the plant and replacing it with a plant that better fits the space available. Do not give in to the practice of taking a saw and cutting these beautiful trees off at shoulder height.

  • ‘Healthy chocolate?’ Is that possible?

    Ah, February! The month when our minds turn to matters of the heart, jewelry and of course, chocolate. 

    Chocolate has always been considered a “guilty pleasure” but now there is a glimmer of hope…“healthy chocolate.” 

    Can it be? Healthy chocolate sounds like a dream come true but don’t expect it to gain status as a health food quite yet. More research will be needed to confirm chocolate’s role in heart health. 

  • Moles and voles are on the rise

    Mole problems seem to be on the rise. Tunnels and more tunnels everywhere you turn, what can be done? How can we control these critters? First, we must be sure it is indeed a mole and not a vole.

    Moles have a hairless, pointed snout that extends out one-half inch in front of the mouth, tiny eyes and no external ears. Their large paddle-like forefeet and sharp claws enable the mole to swim through the soil. 

  • 4-H students learn about robotics

    Brunswick County 4-H needs help identifying adults who want to spend a few hours each month with youth learning about robotics in a 4-H club setting in the Southport/Oak Island area. The current club leaders are unable to continue serving, but there is still a lot of interest among members to carry on the club.

    Robotics provides hands-on experiences in designing, programming and building robots using Lego MindStorms Robotics kits and RoboLab software. The club won second place in robot design at the Robotics Kickoff competition this year.

  • County to publish Green Pages

    Looking for an inexpensive way to market your horticulture business? Be a part of the updated Brunswick County Green Pages, a publication of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service listing businesses providing products and services to the people of Brunswick County.

    If you sell plants and garden supplies, lawn mowers and other equipment, market fruits and vegetables, or provide landscape installation and maintenance services, don’t miss this opportunity.

  • Winter watering: Plants need less now than in summer

    By Judy Koehly 
    Master Gardener

    Plants don’t need as much care in winter as they do in summer, but it is important not to neglect watering your plants over the winter. Some ice or wind damage is unavoidable, but a lot of cold weather damage to plants’ cells is caused by dehydration. In our region, normal winter precipitation is enough for plants because their cold weather watering needs are considerably less; however, making sure your plants have adequate hydration is the best way to protect them harsh weather.

  • What to keep or get rid of in your landscape

    Winter is a good time to think about renovating your landscape. It is easier to see the bare bones of the garden without the distraction of foliage or blooms. It is always wise to keep some of the plants in an established landscape. That way you can still provide habitats for wildlife and reduce erosion. The trick is in knowing which plants to keep. Here are a few guidelines to help you sift through all your botanical choices.