.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

County Extension

  • Since it’s Heart Month be good to your heart

    Ah, February! It’s that sweet time of year when our thoughts turn to roses, romance and chocolate. 

    American Heart Month is also a wonderful time to appreciate the daily beat of your own heart and to renew your personal commitment to taking care of it. If you have neglected that important organ a little more than you should have this past year, these tips will get you back on track. 

    Limit unhealthy fats 

  • Bring springtime inside this winter with bulbs

    Thanks to Sharon Dowdy of the University of Georgia for the following information:

    Flowering bulbs typically herald the coming of spring. By using a technique called “forcing” you can enjoy many springtime bulbs during the winter, too.

    “My first Christmas in Ringold, Ga., I bought amaryllis bulbs and had a contest with the ladies in the Extension office,” said Charles Lancaster, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent in Catoosa County. “I bought bulbs in four colors, and we each picked one.” 

  • Cook once, but you can eat twice

    Do you struggle to figure out what to prepare for dinner on a daily basis? Is the evening meal just one more thing added to your already busy schedule? Give yourself a break by trying the technique of  “cook once, eat twice.”

  • Preparing your veggie garden for spring

    I received a call from a consumer the other day wanting to know what he could do out in the garden this time of year. People usually don’t start getting the “garden bug” until the weather warms up a bit. I told him one of the tasks he could work on is preparing the vegetable garden for spring planting.

  • A weed you want in your landscape

    By TOM WOODS
    MASTER GARDENER

    Butterfly weed is one weed you want in your landscape. It’s a butterfly magnet. The leaves are the preferred food source for the larvae of several species of butterflies, including Monarchs and the flowers provide nectar for both butterflies and hummingbirds.

  • Get to know the Waccamaw River Blue Trail

    By Susan Brown
    County Extension

    Looking for a pristine, quiet, secluded place to take a break? How about an adventure with the possibility of spotting common wildlife species such as black bear, deer, wild turkey or American alligator? If the answer is yes, then you need to explore the Waccamaw River, right here in Brunswick County.

  • Blanketing your water heater saves energy

    By Melissa Hight
    County Extension

    This winter has been unusually cold and most of us have received our recent electric bills—not a pleasant experience. What can you do to reduce the amount of electricity you use year round? You can begin with adding a water heater blanket, even if the hot water heater is in a part of the house that is not subject to extreme weather. 

  • Cold and ice

    The rock band “Foreigner” had a song in the early 1980s titled “Cold as Ice.” They were, of course, lamenting the emotional cold of a failed relationship, but the real cold and ice have been recent visitors here in southeastern North Carolina. The logical question is, “What’s all this cold weather done to our plants?” 

  • January is an excellent time to think about landscape design

    By Judy Koehly
    Master Gardener

    January is here to show you the “bare bones” of your landscape design. Gone are all the wonderful distractions of overflowing hanging baskets, profuse blossoms and lush herbaceous plants. What you see now is the framework of your gardens. Now you can really see the basic structure of your landscape and make plans for any changes you deem necessary.

  • Culinary herb gardening

    By Susan Brown
    Brunswick County Extension

    These days with the struggling economy, people are looking for ways to save money. One way to cut corners is to grow your own food. It might actually be the first time you could answer questions like where was your food grown, what type of soils and fertilizers were used in its production and were any pesticides or fungicides applied to the plant material?