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County Extension

  • Students explore Life on the Farm

    Nearly 500 students from Bolivia Elementary, Lincoln Elementary, Town Creek Elementary, Belville Elementary and Supply Elementary attended the 2010 4-H Life on the Farm program at Funston Farm in Winnabow on Sept. 21, 22, 24 and Oct. 6, 7 where a day in the classroom outdoors-style was accompanied by a hayride and tour of the farm owned by Wilbur and Mary Earp.

    The tour educated students on crops and animals grown on the farm, which included swine, beef cattle, corn, soybeans, wheat and hay. 

  • Students take part in state fair

    Once again, youth gathered at the North Carolina State Fair to show off their top turkey hens they had raised during the North Carolina Youth Market Turkey Show program.

  • Students take part in national horticulture convention

    Twelve youth delegates representing the state of North Carolina attended the 76th annual National Junior Horticultural Association’s (NJHA) annual convention in Cleveland, Ohio, Oct. 8-11.

    Founded in 1934, NJHA was the first organization to provide a national platform for youth to build a basic understanding and skills in the art and science of horticulture. Through national contests, projects, field trips and workshops, NJHA connects young people to careers in the horticulture industry and develops their appreciation for the importance of plants in our daily lives.

  • Autumn is here, get out your rakes for compost

    Tom Woods 
    Master Gardener

    It’s autumn and that means it’s time to start raking those leaves, but instead of just bagging up foliage and throwing it away, look into ways leaves can be composted.

  • Camellia sasanqua performs well in cool weather

    By Susan Brown
    County Extension Agent

    The cooler weather and shorter days cause many plants to go dormant. One plant that is gearing up to perform is the wonderful camellia sasanqua. Like magnolias, they are a Southern favorite. Sasanquas are evergreen and the foliage alone makes this plant a gem in the garden.

  • Cool weather weed invasion

    As the temperatures cool into the 30s at night and the days hover in the 60s, we know  winter isn’t too far away. Our winters aren’t usually too bad, but these cooler temperatures set the stage for cool weather weeds like wild garlic and annual bluegrass to fill in weak spots in the lawn.

  • Winter is on its way; think about your garden

    By Susan Brown
    Horticulture Extension Agent

    The days are starting to get shorter and the temperatures are getting cooler. This means one thing: winter is on its way. Trees are starting to shed their leaves and perennials are starting to look a little ragged, so it is time to think about winterizing your garden. 

  • County extension events

    Osteoporosis program

    Anyone who knows someone who has broken a bone due to osteoporosis knows the pain and potential disability caused by this disease. Characterized by fragile bones, osteoporosis is a major public health problem. It is estimated one in every two women will suffer from osteoporosis in her lifetime. Osteoporosis is not just a woman’s disease; one in every four men will also have an osteoporosis-related fracture.

  • Now is the time to plant spring-flowering bulbs

    It is time for planting spring-flowering bulbs. Following are some tips on more effectively utilizing bulbs:

    Color Blocking

  • More re-blooming azalea varieties

    We have discussed at length all 24 varieties of Encore Azalea that were developed by Mr. Buddy Lee and marketed by Flowerwood Nursery in Alabama. We all have our favorites but, whichever one you choose, this is one of the great plant marketing success stories of all time.