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County Extension

  • River Run Plantation to have community rain garden planting event

    Community volunteers will join the North Carolina Coastal Federation for a rain garden planting event at River Run Plantation subdivision from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Nov. 3. Residents and other volunteers will install native plants, trees and shrubs in four newly constructed rain gardens at the community boat ramp adjacent to the Lockwood Folly River. 

  • November is the right time to plant spring-flowering bulbs

    By Carol Weaver

    Master Gardener

    November is a good time to plant spring-flowering bulbs. Spring and early summer flowering bulbs must be planted in the fall to develop strong root systems and to satisfy the cold requirements of the bulbs. 

  • Brown joins Brunswick County Cooperative Extension Office

    SUSAN BROWN
    Extension HORTICULTURE AGENT

    My name is Susan Brown and I am the newest addition to the Brunswick County Extension Office. My specialty is horticulture. I am really excited about getting to know the people of Brunswick County. 

  • Improve the garden with interesting, colorful bulbs

    Hopefully, the tough economic times haven’t pushed you to the brink like George Bailey contemplating the plunge into the icy water in the classic 1946 movie. Times are pretty bad, but just as George comes to understand, we do have a wonderful life here in southeastern North Carolina. 

    While I’m certainly not trying for my wings as your guardian angel, I do have some suggestions for simple, low-cost things you can do in the garden that won’t require signing your life away at the building and loan.

  • Purchasing spring-flowering bulbs for planting in November

    If you’d like to take advantage of the variety of spring-flowering bulbs available from catalogs and online merchants, time is running out. If you plan to purchase your bulbs locally, you probably want to make the purchases soon after they arrive in the stores so you get the best selection and quality.

  • Digging dirt: Garden chores for a slower season

    If you’re like me and get bored pretty easily, you may be wondering what to do in the garden now that mowing and battling weeds is slowing down. Of course, there’s always football, basketball, hockey, eating too much and all of those parties and family get-togethers during the holiday season to look forward to, but there’s nothing more therapeutic than getting some dirt under those fingernails. 

  • Plants that attract beneficial insects

    Nature is filled with “good bugs,” crawling and flying creatures whose diet consists mainly of the pests that ravage garden plants. Below is a list of those good bugs and the plants that they like to visit for food and shelter. Intersperse these plants among the “problem pest areas” in your yard. Remember, though, many chemical sprays work on both bad and good bugs. To keep the good bugs in your yard, eliminate insecticide use in the areas where they live and work.

  • Fall fragrance is in the air

    Plants from the genus Osmanthus are great large, evergreen shrubs to add to your landscape. Give them a bit of room and they’ll reward you with dark green foliage and tiny white flowers that will perfume your garden. In our area, consider Fragrant Tea Olive (Osmanthus fragrans), Holly Tea Olive (Osmanthus heterophyllus) and Fortune’s Osmanthus (Osmanthus x fortunei).

  • Fire ants may follow flooding

    Due to the vast amounts of rain, we will be blessed with an abundance of fire ants. As things dry out and we maintain moderate temperatures in many areas of the state, we are likely to see the late season fire ant mounds showing up.

  • Fall irrigation manipulation

    Shorter days and cooler temperatures have finally arrived. We don’t have to mow as much because the grass is slowing down. Trees and shrubs are losing their leaves and getting prepared for the winter dormant period. And, sports fans are enjoying the baseball playoffs leading up to the grand finale—the World Series.

    Somewhere between watching the boys of October and trying to figure out the craziness that is the Bowl Championship Series, you need to give your irrigation system a bit of attention.