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County Extension

  • 4-H plans photo contest; Brunswick students can participate

    The North Carolina 4-H Photo Contest is open to all North Carolina youth ages 9-18. Participants do not have to be current members of 4-H.
    The purpose of this exhibition is to provide a showcase of youths’ photographic accomplishments.

  • 4-H Summer enrichment program begins June 11

    Brunswick County 4-H, sponsored by the North Carolina Cooperative Extension, will offer a variety of activities, field trips and day camps for children ages 5-19 through the Exploring the World of 4-H Summer Enrichment Program beginning June 11.
    Registration can be made through the Cooperative Extension 4-H office in person or online or via mail. For links to the catalog of activities, visit www.brunswick.ces.ncsu.edu.

  • Prepare now to protect plants from Japanese beetles

    Japanese beetles and other summer beetles will soon be busy chewing plants. The Master Gardeners will respond to many calls concerning these beetles. Let’s look at these evil critters.
    Adult Japanese beetles live for about four to six weeks, lay eggs and die. The rest of the year, the beetles live underground in a grub stage. These plump, C-shaped white grubs literally turn up in gardens when the soil is tilled in the spring. They feed on the roots of grass and other plants before maturing into adult beetles the next summer.
    Adults can fly in and out

  • A lot less controversial: proposed lawn healthcare reform

    Healthcare legislation has dominated news coverage for the last few months. The health of your lawn is a bit less controversial but almost as important to lots of home gardeners.
    Some folks make fertilizing the lawn more complicated than the intricacies of the latest government budget proposal, but it doesn’t have to be that way.

  • All you wanted to know about butterflies: Part III

    Listed below are some of the public gardens you may visit in North Carolina that have butterfly gardens or habitats:
    •North Carolina Zoological Park, Asheboro
    •Magic Wings, Museum of Life and Science, Durham
    •Roper Mountain Science Center’s Butterfly Garden, Greenville
    I hope you enjoy your butterfly garden. A good website for more information is: http://butterflywebsite.com/. Below is a list of the Top 10 butterflies and host plants:

  • Recent dry times have some lawns struggling in Brunswick County

    Our lawns and gardens have been struggling through some dry times lately, so lots of folks have been firing up those irrigation systems or dragging hoses to make up the difference.
    Newly planted trees, shrubs and lawns and vegetable gardens need the most help. Well-established trees and shrubs will be just fine even if they do drop a few leaves. Just remember to water thoroughly and deeply each time and wait for slight signs of stress to time your next watering.

  • Summer flower show just beginning

    Southern magnolias have already begun their summer show and the early-blooming crape myrtles like Natchez won’t be far behind. Included are a few of the things I learned after observing these plants over the years.
    Little Gem continues to be the most popular southern magnolia in the trade. There are some perfectly good reasons for that. It fits better into most gardens since it only reaches about 30 feet or so. Little Gem also blooms heavily at an early age. That’s something many of the southern magnolias don’t do.

  • Mosquitoes, ticks: more than pests

    It is that time of year again when the smallest of creatures can cause the biggest health problems. Mosquitoes and ticks can be found just about everywhere in North Carolina posing a serious threat to the public’s health.

  • All you wanted to know about butterflies: Part I

    Butterflies are some of the most beautiful creatures around. They range in size from very tiny to quite large. In the coastal Carolinas, some you may see are swallowtails, whites, sulphur, gossamer-wing, metalmarks, brush-footed, skippers, and if you are lucky, monarchs.

  • It’s strawberry time at local farms

    It’s strawberry picking time in southeastern North Carolina. That always brings some questions about growing those big, juicy berries in the home garden. Unfortunately, you can’t grow the strawberries that you see grown commercially in the fields of local producers such as Waccamaw River Farm in Ash, Holden Brothers south of Shallotte and Indigo Farms in Calabash.