.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

County Extension

  • 4-H to offer summer programs starting June 17

    The line of school buses at the Brunswick County Government Complex was a sight to see last Thursday, June 10, as they made their way back to the garage to be parked for summer. It was a sure sign school is officially out.
    As the 4-H staff noticed them outside their office windows, it reminded them the Brunswick County summer fun “Exploring the World of 4-H” program would begin in less than 24 hours.

  • Dealing with wet gardens and landscapes

    Most gardeners view rainfall as a good thing. But too much of a good thing—namely rain—can be bad. Disease is always an issue when there is abundant moisture and plants don’t have time to dry out.
    Many ornamentals, particularly annuals and tender perennials, suffer in the form of leaf spots and root rot. If annuals are not planted on raised beds, too much rainfall can cause them to die.

  • Trouble with tomatoes? It could be tomato spotted wilt virus

    While there are many plant diseases that make growing tomatoes a challenge in the Southeast, a relatively new disease threatens to make homegrown tomatoes almost impossible for many local gardeners.
    Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV) is different from most tomato diseases because it is caused by a virus rather than a fungus or bacteria. Most virus diseases in plants cause the infected plant to show strange color patterns on the leaves or flowers and may cause stunting, but usually do not kill their host plant outright.

  • Keep dinner guests smiling with safe grilling and food preparation

    Do you like your neighbors and friends and want to keep them happy? If so, when you invite them over for a cookout, make sure the food is safe. Bacteria can multiply quickly in warm, summer temperatures and can turn outdoor entertaining into a neighborhood nightmare. 

    Food safety is just as important when grilling outdoors as it is in the kitchen. Food that is not handled properly can make you sick. To keep guests safe from food-borne illness, follow these tips.

    Clean

  • Roundup: A great weed control tool, but it may be harmful to some plants

           

     

  • Brunswick County 4-H program hosts annual fashion revue for participants

     Brunswick County 4-H hosted its annual fashion revue on May 17 at the Cooperative Extension office. 

    After a welcome and introduction by 4-H agent Blair Green, members showed off their homemade garments during a fashion show. Participants were judged on such criteria as construction, fit and presentation.

    Participating in the 9-11 age division were: Alexis Apple, daughter of Trisha and Donald Apple of Ash; Lydia and Mary Ellen Lewis, daughters of Jim and Vicki Lewis of Calabash; and Amanda Rossell, daughter of Timothy Rossell of Bolton. 

  • The North invades the South again but it doesn’t work with plants

    Many people who move down into Southeastern North Carolina from more northern and colder climates bring with them a preference for plants they grew so beautifully in the North. 

  • They add color to the landscape but don’t get too attached to Mimosas

     Mimosas are putting on their summer show of silky, pink flowers all over southeastern North Carolina. With beautiful flowers and incredibly fast growth, you would think this medium-sized tree would be a popular addition to the landscape. Unfortunately, this plant tends to be a little on the trashy side with seedlings popping up all over the place. 

  • They add color to the landscape but don’t get too attached to Mimosas

     Mimosas are putting on their summer show of silky, pink flowers all over southeastern North Carolina. With beautiful flowers and incredibly fast growth, you would think this medium-sized tree would be a popular addition to the landscape. Unfortunately, this plant tends to be a little on the trashy side with seedlings popping up all over the place. 

  • 4-H plans photo contest; Brunswick students can participate

    The North Carolina 4-H Photo Contest is open to all North Carolina youth ages 9-18. Participants do not have to be current members of 4-H.
    The purpose of this exhibition is to provide a showcase of youths’ photographic accomplishments.