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County Extension

  • TiLT welcomes 11 new Brunswick members

    Brunswick County 4-H Teens in Leadership Training (TiLT) have welcomed 11 new youths to its 4-H Youth Volunteer Program. They were trained, along with four other youths, at the weekend training on Feb. 16-17 at Fort Caswell.
    The new youths, all from Brunswick County, are in sixth through 11th grade. They include: Owen Bell, Nikki Cooper, Bryant Holden, Sadie Huntly, Alison Jones, Bethany Jones, Bobbi Jane Lawrence, Breanna Long, Savanna Moore, Katlyn Toney and Campbell Woody.

  • 4-H’ers celebrate year with Hawaiian achievement banquet

    Brunswick County 4-H celebrated 2012 with a Hawaiian “4-0” theme at its annual achievement banquet on Thursday, March 7. The room was decorated in purple and green with help from Linda Marlowe and flowers made by members of the 4-H Teen Council. All attendees received leis and a spyglass.
    Youth enjoyed a purple and green candy bar and the food catered by Smithfield’s Chicken and Barbeque. Breanna Long shared a comedy skit, and Kenan Bridges and Sammi Lawrence sang “Lucky.”

  • Let’s talk carrots, baby—they’re 4 calories each, and good

    How can something as simple as carrots be so confusing and dare I say controversial?
    This past week, I once again got an email telling me not to eat baby carrots. I couldn’t just forward this on to my unsuspecting friends. I had to learn more about the concern. Was there some merit in this warning?

  • Don’t neglect watering your plants during the winter

    By Judy Koehly
    Master Gardener
    Plants don’t need as much care in winter as they do in summer, but it is important not to neglect watering your plants during the winter.
    Some ice or wind damage is unavoidable, but a lot of cold weather damage to plants’ cells is caused by dehydration. In our region, normal winter precipitation is enough for plants because their cold-weather watering needs are considerably less. However, making sure your plants have adequate hydration is the best way to protect them in harsh weather.

  • Master Gardeners to have plant sale April 4-6
  • Growing camellias in North Carolina: Fighting disease and pests

    By Shirley Waggoner-Eisenman
    Brunswick County Master Gardener

  • Learn about calcium for your bones

    During the past couple of weeks, I’ve seen articles on the web, in newspapers and on the television news about new recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force for calcium and vitamin D.
    They are recommending against daily supplementation with 400 IU or less of vitamin D3 and 1,000 mg of calcium carbonate for healthy older women, stating that it doesn’t work to prevent bone fractures in post-menopausal women. However, they say that the data is insignificant to make recommendations for larger doses of these supplements or for younger women or men.

  • County gets Eat Smart, Move More grant

    Brunswick County has received a state Eat Smart, Move More N.C. Community Grant to fund local healthy eating and physical activity projects in 2012-13. Additional project partners include the Obesity Prevention Initiative at UNCW, the Brunswick County Health Department, the Wilmington Metropolitan Planning Organization and the town of Navassa.
    The grant will fund play structures and equipment for Phoenix Park, which currently has no infrastructure to encourage physical activity.

  • Master Gardener Grace Wrigley wins 4-H Volunteer of the Year award

    “Celebrating the Revolution of Responsibility” was the theme for the North Carolina 4-H Volunteer Leaders’ Conference in Raleigh Feb. 8-10. More than 250 4-H volunteer leaders from across North Carolina participated in the conference.
    Brunswick County 4-H volunteer Grace Wrigley attended the educational workshops and received the southeast district’s Volunteer of the Year award.

  • Thinking about canning this year? It’s time to heat up your kitchen

    The home canning season isn’t really that far away. If you’re thinking about “putting food up” this summer, this is a great time to learn more, before the busy time gets here.
    As a friend of mine who is a food safety specialist says, “Home canning isn’t rocket science, but it does require time and effort. And it must be done properly to ensure safety.”
    People have been preserving food for centuries in an effort to keep food from a time of plenty for a time of need.