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Religion

  • Being busy can become a debilitating dis-ease

     

     

    Long ago, Hubby Dear acquired a nickname for me. He said he was going to start calling me “IST.” Yes, you read it correctly: I S T. The letters are shorthand for I’m So Tired. Gleefully he continued, “Then the children can call you MIST … Mom’s So Tired … and the grands would address you as “Grammist”… Gram’s So Tired.” The other funny thing is that the idea took hold! I am now Mist/Grammist. He dares not call me IST!

  • I’m only one person; what can I do???

    Edward Everett Hale is quoted as saying: “I am only one, but I am one. I cannot do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do.” His statement got me thinking. Too often I hear folks remarking about their singular inability to do anything about situations, both local and global. “I can’t” is the byword. It is their explanation and rationale. It is also a justification to be excused from participation and responsibility.

  • To do spiritual writing is a learned experience

     Are you a person who has always wanted to write about your understanding of a Scriptural parable you read or heard? Are you someone who has done journaling but is now stuck in a kind of spiritual stagnation? Have you experienced Scripture as words without much real application to your life? Or, are you an individual who has been told writing is not your skill and spiritual writing is only for experts with academic degrees?

     

  • Having a tattooed heart is love inked in boundless compassion

     

     

    The year 2011 was monumental for me. It touched, but never exceeded the proportions of love recalled and recounted in a book that brought Hubby Dear to tears. Each page of each chapter conveyed details that brought hearts tattooed with love and compassion into clear vision. More than that, they evoked imitation.

  • We have a treasure not made of gold

     I always loved a hymn written by John Foley, SJ. Originally released in 1975, Earthen Vessels was the second album from the St. Louis Jesuits and was most popular in the ‘70s and ‘80s — the heyday of my life as a professional religious educator. Its message, taken from 2 Corinthians 4:7, formed me early in my ministry. It continues to provide me with a vision and goal which deepens as I age.

    The words offer all a great reminder of who we are, as inspired humans, flawed but faithful. For those unfamiliar with the hymn, the refrain is:

  • Slow down, you move too fast!

     The song lyrics erupted in my head. “Slow down, you move too fast. You got to make the morning last, You got to make the morning last. Just kicking down the cobble stones. Looking for fun and feelin' groovy. Got no deeds to do, No promises to keep. I'm dappled and drowsy and ready to sleep. Let the morning time drop all its petals on me. Life, I love you, All is groovy.”

  • Longing for leadership is a holy and wholesome yearning

     

     

  • Who is my neighbor?

     When I hear talk of building walls to keep people away, to keep them out of our workplaces, schools, country, our very hearts and lives, I also hear a question posed in Scripture. It’s a familiar story told by the Lukan community in the gospel proclaimed in many churches. It’s the tale of a scholar of the law who stood tall with a provocative query. “Teacher,” he asked, “What must I do to inherit eternal life?”

  • Breaking barriers is exciting work
  • It’s a scandal when security becomes a stumbling block

     A recent message from Richard Rohr, OFM, caught my attention and subsequently my heart. It continues to offer light and insight into the dilemma we humans face as we live in a world that allows evil to flourish because people remain scandalously and silently secure in their own little locale.