• Having a tattooed heart is love inked in boundless compassion



    The year 2011 was monumental for me. It touched, but never exceeded the proportions of love recalled and recounted in a book that brought Hubby Dear to tears. Each page of each chapter conveyed details that brought hearts tattooed with love and compassion into clear vision. More than that, they evoked imitation.

  • We have a treasure not made of gold

     I always loved a hymn written by John Foley, SJ. Originally released in 1975, Earthen Vessels was the second album from the St. Louis Jesuits and was most popular in the ‘70s and ‘80s — the heyday of my life as a professional religious educator. Its message, taken from 2 Corinthians 4:7, formed me early in my ministry. It continues to provide me with a vision and goal which deepens as I age.

    The words offer all a great reminder of who we are, as inspired humans, flawed but faithful. For those unfamiliar with the hymn, the refrain is:

  • Slow down, you move too fast!

     The song lyrics erupted in my head. “Slow down, you move too fast. You got to make the morning last, You got to make the morning last. Just kicking down the cobble stones. Looking for fun and feelin' groovy. Got no deeds to do, No promises to keep. I'm dappled and drowsy and ready to sleep. Let the morning time drop all its petals on me. Life, I love you, All is groovy.”

  • Longing for leadership is a holy and wholesome yearning



  • Who is my neighbor?

     When I hear talk of building walls to keep people away, to keep them out of our workplaces, schools, country, our very hearts and lives, I also hear a question posed in Scripture. It’s a familiar story told by the Lukan community in the gospel proclaimed in many churches. It’s the tale of a scholar of the law who stood tall with a provocative query. “Teacher,” he asked, “What must I do to inherit eternal life?”

  • Breaking barriers is exciting work
  • It’s a scandal when security becomes a stumbling block

     A recent message from Richard Rohr, OFM, caught my attention and subsequently my heart. It continues to offer light and insight into the dilemma we humans face as we live in a world that allows evil to flourish because people remain scandalously and silently secure in their own little locale.

  • Suffering is not easily endured but it pulses with life

     Nobody wants to suffer. Nobody likes it, even if it is inevitable and must be endured. We’d much rather sing a happy tune, wear a smiling face, and pretend there is no ache in our hearts and lives. Yet, if we are honest with ourselves and truthful with our reflection on life, suffering is always present in one form or another.

  • To seek solitude is to know serenity

    Perhaps the pace of the last few weeks has had its effect on me. Whenever I find myself racing from one event to another, one experience to another, my spirit feels the tug of stressfulness. It’s a good thing because I am once again led into the reality that life is more than a rush into activity. I discover anew … and will continue to do so, I am sure … the need for solitude as a means of entry into serenity.

  • God’s politics trump all others

     I know, I know … ‘trump” is a loaded word these days. Whatever one’s affiliation might be, in life’s game folks are always looking for a trump card to hold. This holds true in religious circles as well as political ones. Heated debates derive from our individual and communal desires to be right, inerrant and accurate in our facts and our faith. However, to do so also carries both a challenge and a consequence: CHANGE! In turn, change demands continued conversation, communication, and charity.