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Religion

  • All creation teaches us how to be human

     Everyone knows I love to read. That’s a universal statement. I love to read fiction as well as non-fiction. I love to read about church issues and human-interest stories found in newspapers and magazines. When nothing else is available, I will scan cereal boxes. Everything piques my curiosity, deepens my interest and expands my thirst for understanding. So, when Hubby Dear peers across the room to find my nose buried in a book, he sighs with the knowledge I’ve left this world to find treasures to be claimed and reclaimed in daily life.

  • All creation teaches us how to be human

     Everyone knows I love to read. That’s a universal statement. I love to read fiction as well as non-fiction. I love to read about church issues and human-interest stories found in newspapers and magazines. When nothing else is available, I will scan cereal boxes. Everything piques my curiosity, deepens my interest and expands my thirst for understanding. So, when Hubby Dear peers across the room to find my nose buried in a book, he sighs with the knowledge I’ve left this world to find treasures to be claimed and reclaimed in daily life.

  • All creation teaches us how to be human

     Everyone knows I love to read. That’s a universal statement. I love to read fiction as well as non-fiction. I love to read about church issues and human-interest stories found in newspapers and magazines. When nothing else is available, I will scan cereal boxes. Everything piques my curiosity, deepens my interest and expands my thirst for understanding. So, when Hubby Dear peers across the room to find my nose buried in a book, he sighs with the knowledge I’ve left this world to find treasures to be claimed and reclaimed in daily life.

  • To balance peace and justice is a great challenge

     

    One of my daily devotionals got me to thinking even more deeply about two realities: peace and justice. I have often struggled to understand their juxtaposition. This lead to me grappling with the need for contemplation as well as action; action as an outgrowth of contemplation. Quickly, I was immersed in a chicken and egg dilemma. Which comes first? How does one achieve a “both/and” posture? The dilemma is ongoing.

  • Learn to value the things that really matter

     It seems eons ago, but only a few weeks have passed since I spent time listening and learning about the reality of homelessness. Thanks to the gift of a small portion of soup and a slice of bread for lunch, I also tasted a tiny fraction of what it means to be hungry. I was among the hundred or so folks who attended the fourth annual Hunger and Homeless Banquet presented by the Brunswick County Homeless Coalition.

  • For what should we give thanks?

     

  • Homelessness is everybody's problem
  • November is the month for remembrance

     As I type, I feel the heaviness of a rainy day … a day when I’d rather be ensconced on a soft sofa with a novel and a cup of steaming coffee close at hand. I find it hard to be uplifted and uplifting when the skies are gray, drenching an already saturated earth with more water than it can possibly hold. Adding to the angst, the time has changed. Daylight is no longer being saved. Instead, darkness makes an earlier descent. How quickly gladness can turn to gloom!

  • What does it mean to be fully alive?

     By this time, most folks know that I am enthralled by the words and work of Richard Rohr, OFM. His theology and philosophy of life converge on a single theme: both/and. His presentations, programs, books and very person exude an enthusiasm for the simplicity and complexity of paradoxical living based on the reality that we are always living in the ambience of both this and that, both here and there, both now and then.

  • Eight simple rules for life's journey

     Untimely deaths often bring a new awareness of life. When the deaths are those of central figures in the media or sitcoms or leaders of nations, we are forced into seeing life anew. I would suspect some folks will be unwilling to enter the experience. It may be they are coping with personal losses and the subsequent reconstruction of their life. For them, the degree of difficulty is prohibitive. Others may enter with mixed emotions, anxiously acknowledging their desire yet willing to learn new skills in adapting to existence without a loved one.