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Today's Features

  •  Last week I reviewed some of the common causes of excessive or destructive chewing in dogs while encouraging you to drink wine. This week, I’d like to tackle some tips for taming teething troubles, while recommending you sip a cocktail. You definitely deserve it, especially if because your Dolce is missing its Gabbana.

     

    Treating chewing

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     By Linda Arnold

         Quick: What does the cool side of the pillow have in common with finding money in a coat pocket? 

         They both rank among the little things in life that bring us the most joy. Sure, the major milestones leave their marks. How often do they occur, though? And what sustains us in between those times?

     

    High fives

  • By John Nelson

  •  By Linda Arnold

     

    If you’re like me, you’re drawn to those lists of quick tips that bombard us from supermarket checkout counters, magazine covers, news feeds and online email blasts. Blasting belly fat seems to be the popular topic right now.

    I ran across one the other day, though, that’s much more global. Combined with additional research, it yielded some insights you may find helpful.

     

    Rules for being human

  •  Part 1: Causes

    Some things were destined to go together: French fries and ketchup. Wine and cheese. Dogs and chewing. Yes, I went there. One of the most common questions I hear from frazzled pet parents donning mismatched socks and tattered footwear is, “Why does my dog chew everything?” This week, we’ll sample some of the common causes of excessive chewing followed by simple solutions in my next column. Settle in, grab a glass of vino and dine on the reasons your dog may chew too much.

     

  •  By John Nelson

    “You can’t step into the same river twice.” (attributed to Heraclitus)

  • It was a sell-out last fall, and it’s back again for a full season this year.

    The Sunset Beach Waterfront Market kicks off its second season from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, May 5, in Sunset Beach Town Park, 206 Sunset Blvd N.

    This year’s market, orchestrated by the nonprofit Sunset Beach Business and Merchants Association (SBBMA), will continue every Thursday during these hours through Oct. 27.

    Highlights include fresh produce and farm eggs, jams, jellies and honey, original art, homemade products and works by local authors.

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    We all do it. We do it every time we change the litter or hear the call of compacted clay being clawed. I’m talking about inspecting our cat’s stools. We humans are inexplicably interested in monitoring our companion animal’s eliminations. And that’s a good thing. Identifying a bathroom problem early can prevent more serious complications and restore health to an ailing kitty.

  • It’s an annual event to rally for a cure, and to wear lots of pink and purple.

    This year, the 31st annual Relay for Life of Brunswick County will be a one-day event, scheduled from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, May 21, in M.H. Rourk Stadium at West Brunswick High School, 550 Whiteville Road in Shallotte.

    At last count, 51 Relay for Life teams and 452 participants had committed to raising funds that had already exceeded $115,000.

  •  Jacob A. Young has been commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force after completing the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps program and graduating with a bachelor's degree from Ohio University, Athens, Ohio.    

    Young is the son of Anthony and Cindy Young of Oak Island.

    He is a 2011 graduate of Randolph High School in Universal City, Texas.