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Today's Features

  • If you go

    What: Sunset at Sunset

    When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4

    Where: Village at Sunset Beach

    Cost: Free admission

    Go to: www.sunsetatsunset.com

    Vendors and music will once again collide when the eighth annual Sunset at Sunset celebrates the fall season in Sunset Beach next to Ingram Planetarium.

    Highlights include vendors, crafters, food, nonprofit groups, a kids’ korner and stage entertainment.

    Festivities begin at 10 a.m. and continue until 5 p.m.

  • IF YOU GO

    What: Farm Heritage Day

    When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 4

    Where: Indigo Farms

    Cost: Free; charges for some activities

    Saturday, Oct. 4, is Farm Heritage Day at Indigo Farms, with a farmyard full of planned activities.

    Events kick off at 10 a.m.

    Highlights include horse-drawn demonstrations, indigo-dyeing exhibits, weaving, old tools, 19th-century artifacts and blacksmithing.

  • The season of spookiness has descended.

    You can tell, because ghosts and ghouls and indescribably ghastly things are converging starting this weekend at Grissettown Longwood Fire & Rescue’s six annual haunted trail wending its way next to the fire station at 758 Longwood Road (N.C. 904).

    Yes, it’s eerie, but each year more brave souls turn out to walk the trail.

  • BIG Sweep is sweeping and cleaning up Calabash on Saturday, Oct. 4.

    Volunteers interested in donating time to help clean up the community for two hours will gather at Calabash Community Park, 868 Persimmon Road, starting with registration and a welcome from 9:30 to 10 a.m.

    Litter pickup from 10 a.m. to noon will once again include roadside and river cleanup, if anyone with a boat is interested. After helping out, BIG Sweep participants will be treated to lunch and prizes in the park from noon to 12:30 p.m.

  • CALABASH — She’s an old ambulance sporting a new shade of pink to spread a year-round message.

    At a ceremony last Thursday, Sept. 25, Calabash Volunteer EMS ambulance No. 2971, the oldest in the department fleet, was unveiled as the newly transformed “Vision of Calabash.”

    The station on Beach Drive was decked out in pink for the emergency vehicle unveiling, from balloons and festoons to refreshments. The men on hand were decked out, too, exemplifying real men who wear EMS pink T-shirts during Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October.

  •  By John Nelson

    These are quiet, majestic giants in the swamp, sharing their space with towering cypress and the mournful hoot owls. Their trunks are flared out at the base (much like cypress), and of course you’ve probably seen their peculiar, crooked roots arising from the wet ground, together with knobby, upright knees of the cypress.

  •  By John Nelson

    When I was a kid during the time when the car had roll-down window handles, they would take me and my sister out driving around in the South Carolina Lowcountry every now and then. That’s when I started appreciating just how nice the “low country” of the Palmetto State is. I remember family outings late in the summer to visit some friends at their country home in Hampton County, not too far from the Savannah River, having lunch in the kitchen with what seemed to be miles of old screened windows letting in a fragrant breeze.

  • BIG Sweep is sweeping and cleaning up Calabash on Saturday, Oct. 4.

    Volunteers interested in donating time to help clean up the community for two hours will gather at Calabash Community Park, 868 Persimmon Road, starting with registration and a welcome from 9:30 to 10 a.m.

    Litter pickup from 10 a.m. to noon will again include roadside and river cleanup, if anyone with a boat is interested. After helping out, BIG Sweep participants will be treated to lunch and prizes in the park from noon to 12:30 p.m.

  • By John Nelson

    Plant Columnist

  • apeworms (Dipylidium caninum) are one of the most frequently diagnosed intestinal parasites of dogs and cats. This long, segmented parasite can grow more than two feet long and live in an infected pet’s small intestine for up to three months. Most pet owners rush to the nearest veterinary clinic as soon as they see the glistening white proglottid segments clinging to their pet’s backside or wriggling in the stool. What every pet owner wants to know is can this disgusting worm be living inside him or her? The answer is probably not. Probably. Not.