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Today's Features

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    Many families celebrated Easter this past weekend with a ham. Gathering for holiday ham is a great holiday tradition and like turkey after Thanksgiving, ham leftovers can be a real treat, but what are you doing with those leftovers now?

    Leftover cooked ham should be stored in the refrigerator at 40 degrees or below and used within 3 to 5 days. So, if you had that ham this past Sunday for Easter, you’d better be doing something with it soon.

  •  Marissa Renee Valentine of Ocean Isle Beach and Timothy Wayne Powers of Ash were married April 4 during a private ceremony.

    The bride is the daughter of Eric and Jody Valentine of Supply.

    The groom is the son of Edwin Wayne Powers of Evergreen and Rebecca Benton of Ash.

    A reception is planned for June.

  •  Lisa Marie Kennedy and Albert Dean Browning, both of Shallotte, were married April 4 at their home in Shallotte. William Marlowe officiated the wedding.

    The bride is the daughter of Sharon Honaker of Ramseur and the late Kenneth Kennedy.

    The groom is the son of the late Dan and Ruby Nicholas Browning of Delbarton, W.Va.

    She wore a simple white spring dress with shoulder wrap and white shoes.

    Ringbearer was Abby Ballou.

    Best man was Waylon Saunders.

    A reception followed at the couple’s home.

  •  Arlene Grissett Galloway celebrated a birthday at Jerome’s Steak House in Shallotte with family and friends on Saturday, April 12. Born in the spring of 1913 to the union of Levi O. and Rosa Bryant Grissett, she was blessed to be 101 years old on Sunday, April 13. She received many phone calls and greeted family and friends dropping by with gifts and good wishes.

  •  “Now ‘tis the spring, and weeds are shallow-rooted;

    Suffer them now, and they’ll o’ergrow the garden

    And choke the herbs for want of husbandry.”

     [Shakespeare, Henry VI (part 2)]

     

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    The spring and Easter season will be celebrated in style this week with a number of events planned in and around Brunswick County.

    Southport Spring Festival

    The annual event is scheduled for April 18 and 19 in Franklin Square Park. Admission is free.

    Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.

    Highlights include more than 150 crafters, entertainment, food vendors and children’s activities.

  •   Josephine Gutjahr celebrates her 102nd birthday at Carillon Assisted Living. Born March 22, 1912, in New Hampshire, she is the fourth of eight children, but the first child born in America to Italian parents. She moved to North Carolina from New Jersey in 2003 with her daughter and son-in-law, Roseann and Joe Kronski, and has been at Carillon since 2009. She still loves to sing hymns and Italian songs.

        

     

  •  Many vegetables feel right at home on the grill, but some just aren’t cut out for it, especially those with a high water content. Cucumbers are a no-no on the grill, as is celery, lettuce or most leafy greens.

    A highly skilled backyard chef like me has no trouble grilling asparagus, eggplant, onions and even cabbage. Bell peppers, or even the hot variety, and onions are natural grilling choices.

     

  •  Some would say, “We’ve traveled a ‘fur piece’ this Lenten season.” Those who traveled the Lenten Wednesdays at noon for the annual Lenten luncheon worship services, especially, have come from happily standing beneath the cross to find hope amidst hopelessness, happy to shine our light on a world filled with false crosses and desperate situations. We’ve recognized the instability that comes when we build our house of grace on shifting sands. We’ve tasted the futility of erecting those edifices in the face of oncoming tides.

  • Everyone loves colored eggs at this time of year, but how much do you really know about the egg itself? Quiz yourself to see.

    Answer TRUE or FALSE to these questions:

    1) An extremely old egg will sink to the bottom of a bowl of water.

    2) You can tell if an egg is raw or cooked by spinning it on a tabletop.

    3) The color of the egg yolk is determined by the food the chicken has eaten.