.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  •  By John Nelson 

     

  • Hundreds of runners and walkers alike will trek across the Ocean Isle Beach Bridge at the 11th annual Run for Food scheduled to launch at 9 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 10.

    The event consists of a half-marathon run and 5K run/walk, with proceeds going to benefit the South Brunswick Interchurch Council Food Pantry.

    Participants will follow a course across the scenic Ocean Isle Beach high-rise Intracoastal Waterway bridge to the mainland, then head back to the island.

    The annual event is the largest fundraiser for the SBIC food pantry.

  • The New Year brings a new schedule at the Museum of Coastal Carolina in Ocean Isle Beach.

    The museum will be open Friday, Jan. 2, with its Animal Adventures: Stories & Puppet Playtime for Preschoolers program scheduled for 10:30 a.m. and touch tank feeding at 11 a.m. to help docents feed the sea critters.

  •  Some years ago, a research firm polled about 1,000 adults asking what they did with fruitcake, a symbol of good luck for the New Year, as well as for weddings and other celebrations.

    The result was fairly predictable: 38 percent said they gave it away, 28 percent actually ate it, 13 percent used it as a doorstop, 9 percent scattered it for the birds, 8 percent couldn’t remember and 4 percent threw it out!

  •  Cheryle Jones Syracuse

    Each new year sparks time to reflect on the past and look to the future. Many see this time as an opportunity to make changes in their lives. That’s where those New Year’s resolutions come into play. So frequently people set goals to do something good for themselves in the new year.  Unfortunately, quite often these are goals are very unrealistic.

  • SUPPLY — It was a bleak wartime winter back in her native Britain in December 1941, and 16-year-old Nora Oglesby and her fellow teen-aged nannies caring for 20 orphaned boys were worried.

    Recently relocated to a Scottish castle away from the deadly barrage of German bombings in England, the staff and children of one of Dr. Thomas Barnardo’s renowned orphanages were poised to observe Christmas with next to nothing.

  • No “Bah Humbugs” from me this week, just a few tips and ideas to help encourage positive and healthy practices to get us all through the holidays.

    Treat!

    Yes, your favorite foods are available (and usually lots of them) this time of year. So treat yourself while trying to be realistic. Go ahead and eat some of those cookies or other holiday goodies…just do so in moderation. Feeling like a martyr about food or trying to give it up completely tends to backfire. Holidays are all about balance.

    Be picky

  • “It’s too darn cold to go out for a walk! Now lay down and quit your whining!”

  • By John Nelson

    Plant Columnist

    You go through life, and you become aware of various truths. For instance, for me as a teacher (maybe you, too?), it seems students are getting steadily younger. What about this one: A lot of books out there were apparently printed with shrinking ink. And here’s another: Christmas comes earlier and earlier every year, it seems. As far as Christmas and this long string of holidays now upon us, here's a botanical reminder of the rapidly changing seasons.

  • An age-old winter custom is the drinking of wassail, which is drunk at Christmas time, New Years and the Twelfth Night. Wassail is a greeting, meaning, “Be in good health!”

    Wassail is also associated with caroling. As the story goes, men would carry a large vessel, usually with handles, from house to house. They would sing, get the vessel filled again, and then go on to the next house. It was a sign of good luck to have them visit.