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Today's Features

  • Just in time for celebrating George Washington’s 286th birthday, Brunswick County author and Washington descendant Mary Shawn Russell has unveiled her comprehensive reference, “Washington’s Bloodline.”

    The book is described as a documentation of 380 years of American history as revealed through the long-lost branch of Washington’s family tree and contains little-known facts providing a glimpse into the life of America’s premier first family.

  • Saturday will be the perfect day to get focused on health as The Brunswick Beacon’s 12th annual Beacon Health Expo takes place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 24 at Shallotte Middle School at 225 Village Road in Shallotte.

    Admission is free, and free childcare will be available.

    Featured are 52 vendors bringing a variety of free screenings and demonstrations, a seminar and information on an array of health-oriented topics.

    Participants include hospitals, dental offices, wellness centers and hearing and eye care specialists.

  • While traveling out west many, many years ago, my wife and I stopped at a little cantina a few miles outside of Sante Fe, N.M., on our way back home. I was starving, and once I woke her up, she was, too.

    Not familiar with their restaurant, I asked the waitress if she could make some suggestions. One of the chicken dishes sounded good to me. She also mentioned that there was a little clothing shop in the other room, so we decided to check it out while waiting on our meals. The waitress then came over to tell us our meals were ready.

  • If you are a cocker spaniel, you may not want to look at this photo!

    Here’s a plant species with a kind of brutal winter beauty, even when dry and dead, the stems topped with a constellation of brown, spiny burs. You might have a feeling this is a plant that wants to spread itself around, if it can. And it wants you to help.

  • By Linda Arnold

     

    You may be feeling “out of sorts.” Or maybe nothing is jazzing you. 

    You can’t quite put your finger on it, although there’s a cloud hanging over you. And it doesn’t seem to be lifting anytime soon.

    This time of year there’s a lack of sunlight in some areas. And that can definitely impact those of you with Seasonal Affective Disorder.

  • Pastor Stephen Nobles and the Sunshine Sisters of New Britton Baptist Church in Ash celebrate the 80th birthday of Alta Mae Inman, who was born Feb. 27, 1938.

  • The New Year is already nearly two months old. So are the resolutions made with great verve and grim determination, only to be subject to procrastination or disillusion. Now, the season of Lent emerges for all of us “second-chancers.” We are given a new opportunity to be transformed into who we really are —if we will receive and accept the gift of prayerful time.

  • Baxter couldn’t stand, much less walk.

    As I looked down at the shaking German shepherd puppy, it was hard to imagine this was the same dog that only a week ago had nearly knocked me over as he bounded into my veterinary clinic. What was going on?

  • Editor’s note: Last in a series of eight columns on “Med instead of Meds.”

    For the last two months I’ve been writing about “Med instead of Meds for Better Health,“ a way of eating that can help reduce your chances of a chronic illness and needing to take medication. The “med way” is modeled after the traditional eating style of people that live in the Mediterranean region.

  • As one of the old guys in the gardening world, I’ve seen lots of changes in the last 35 years as conventional wisdom evolves and changes our recommendations. Pruning flush cuts, tree wraps and planting holes filled with Black Cow have all gone the way of the mammoth and the dodo bird. It seems our long-standing recommendation to wait until mid- to late April to fertilize warm-season grasses may be next on the scrap heap of horticultural history.