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Today's Features

  • A variety of vendors are scheduled for the second Holiday Market from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 21, at Shallotte Farmers Market at Riverside Park at N.C. 130 and Main Street.

    More than 20 vendors will offer winter vegetables, baked goods, sauces, jam, jewelry, pottery, handmade goods, goat’s milk soap, army and navy supplies, scarves and products including Tastefully Simple, Px4Gear, Avon and Dixieland Kettle Corn.

  •  I love curling up on the couch tangled up in kids, dogs and cats sharing a colossal bowl of popcorn while watching a good movie. While the human family relishes the film, I’m pretty sure my dog’s main interest in movie night is the popcorn. That’s OK with me, because popcorn can be a healthy snack for cinema-loving canines.

  •  That beautiful, bronzed, succulent roast turkey! For most of us, the Thanksgiving dinner usually revolves around the big bird. This is probably one of the easiest parts of the meal. Preparing all the other dishes that complement the bird and making sure they’re all done at the same time is the real challenge.

    Most of us buy a frozen turkey and thaw it ahead of time. It takes at least 24 hours in the refrigerator for every 5 pounds of turkey, so a 20-pound bird will take four to five days to thaw.

     

  •  By Linda Arnold

     

    “Seasons change, and so did I. You need not wonder why.” Those lyrics from an old song by The Guess Who speak volumes. You may think the current change of season has to do with falling leaves, football and cooler temperatures, although there’s much more.

    Cycles and rhythms — they’re all part of nature, as well as our lives. 

     

    Reason, season or lifetime

  •  What does a vegetarian eat on Thanksgiving? As this big eating holiday approaches, we are inundated with recipes for how to thaw, dress and season a turkey, the main dish and delicious centerpiece for our holiday tables. But what if you have a vegetarian coming to dinner?

  • By John Nelson

    Every now and then, the mystery plant column features something that isn’t exactly a plant — like this time. I think it’s pretty easy to recognize this thing is some sort of a fungus. That’s right. Fungi are enormously important organisms on our little planet, and everyone has had experiences with them, both good and bad (probably).

  •  By Sam Marshall, Horticulture Agent

    You have likely seen the vibrant pink plumes of muhly grass this fall, now a much-used and vibrant addition to home landscapes. Ornamental grasses are quickly establishing themselves as a common addition to landscape beds and along roadsides. And with good reason. Grasses afford interesting texture and graceful, arching foliage that adds movement to an otherwise stagnant landscape.

  •  By Sam Marshall, Horticulture Agent

    You have likely seen the vibrant pink plumes of muhly grass this fall, now a much-used and vibrant addition to home landscapes. Ornamental grasses are quickly establishing themselves as a common addition to landscape beds and along roadsides. And with good reason. Grasses afford interesting texture and graceful, arching foliage that adds movement to an otherwise stagnant landscape.

  •  The West Brunswick High School graduating class of 1975 spends it 40th class reunion with a meet-and-greet Nov. 6 with more than 80 in attendance. Some classmates even flew in from Texas. A tour of WBHS on Nov. 7 was followed by a banquet that night with 90 classmates (132 attending in total) at The Isles on Ocean Isle Beach. There were many door prizes and a DJ playing ‘70s favorites while dancing in a “Soul Train” line. The class had a worship service the next morning.