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Today's Features

  • Leland Library will host a special storytime in memory of Scarlett the 16-month-old granddaughter of a local resident, at 10 a.m. Monday, Aug. 14.

    This storytime is for children 4 and younger and will be centered around the book “Barnyard Dance” by Sandra Boynton.

    Register at the library and call 371-9442 for more information.

  • The Brunswick County Literacy Council is seeking volunteers to work with adult individuals one-on-one who want to improve their skills in reading, writing and speaking English.

    On Thursday, Aug. 17, there will be an orientation workshop from 10 a.m. to noon and an English for Speakers of Other Languages Tutor Workshop from 1 to 5 p.m. There is a $20 fee for tutor materials.

    All volunteers must attend an orientation workshop. Workshops are held at the BCLC office at 282 Ocean Highway E., Supply 28462.

  • The American Red Cross urges blood donors to give in the final weeks of summer to help overcome a chronic summer blood shortage.

    In August, regular donors may delay giving as final summer vacations are planned and back-to-school activities ramp up. To fully meet the needs of hospital patients in the coming days and weeks, donations are urgently needed from new and current donors. Those who donated blood earlier this summer may be eligible to donate again. Blood can be safely donated every 56 days, and Power Red cells can be donated every 112 days.

  • This time of the year is perfect for a picnic or a cookout. Everyone wants to get out and take in the warm, sunny weather and spend some time at one of our many beaches, but at some point, we’ll all get together and enjoy the bounties of homemade offerings at a cookout or picnic.

    The word picnic actually comes from the French “pique-nique,” which means “a fashionable social entertainment” in which each guest brings a contribution to the feast. In other words, it was just a fancy way of saying “potluck.”

  • By John Nelson

    Here’s a little botanical story involving native lilies. And who doesn’t like lilies?

  • By Linda Arnold

     

    How long have you been yearning to play an instrument, learn a new sport or become a gourmet cook?

    Like most of us, you have stops and starts when it comes to mastering a skill. The key is Vitamin D: Discipline.

    Inspirational speaker Earl Nightingale said you can become an expert by practicing this formula: one hour each day, five days a week, for five years. While that may sound daunting, those five years are going to come and go anyway. It depends on your level of commitment.

  • It all began with an anguished sigh. “My hearing aid is broken!” Yes, there are two aids and only one was inoperable, but the loss is mighty. Voices must now rise to nearly shouting level. There is the return of the repeated question: “What???” It is accompanied by a voiced lament: “I can’t hear you!” Urgent attention to the dilemma was obvious. A trip to Costco became an immediate need. It would definitely be return or replace without repeal.

  • Col. Dean Davis, a 1981 graduate of West Brunswick High School, has retired after 30 years of service with the N.C. Army National Guard. He is the son of Marion and Carolyn Davis of Varnamtown.
    Davis was recently honored at the 75th Davis Reunion at White Lake. Past assignments include Commander of 252 Combined Arms Battalion in Fayetteville; Deputy Director of Infantry Warfighters forum; Deputy Director of the host nation Coordination Cell Ammon Jordan; and Deputy Director U.S. Property and Fiscal Office N.C. Army National Guard.

  • I recently went to a large family reunion where there were lots of hamburgers being cooked on grills. Was there a food thermometer in sight? Nope. USDA advises us to use a food thermometer to accurately measure if meat is cooked to a high enough internal temperature to destroy any harmful bacteria that may cause a foodborne illness. This means on the grill, too. Many folks are not in the habit of using these tools and they are easily forgotten when packing for a picnic or cooking outside.

  • Jim Gregory, a local resident and retired N.C. State forestry professor, sent me a note about a plant that he calls “niruri.” If you are into plant Latin, it’s Phyllanthus urinaria. In South America and Asia, this plant grows into a small shrub used to make an herbal remedy for kidney stones. “Niruri” literally means “break stone” in Spanish.