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Today's Features

  •  Doug Powell says he can’t watch cooking shows on television. Why not? He complains the music is terrible, the chefs awful and the food safety non-existent.

    I happen to agree with Dr. Powell. I usually can’t watch cooking shows because the food safety practices concern me. On one half-hour show, I spotted at least three things, including recipes for home canning and meat cooking temperatures, that were just wrong!

  •  Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Tiffani Nikole Frink and Nicholas Patrick Fulford.

    The bride-elect is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Frink of Shallotte. She is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Wilmington and is a third-grade teacher at Virginia Williamson Elementary School in Bolivia.

    The prospective groom is the son of Van and Sharon Fulford of Supply. He is co-owner of Fulford Concrete in Supply.

    An April wedding is planned at The Barn at Rock Creek in Leland.

  •  By Linda Arnold

     

    I first saw this sign at a seminar years ago.

    It seemed like such a no-brainer. Of course, I’d rather be happy than right! It’s amazing, though, how many times we can become so attached to our positions — and “dug in” — that proving our point becomes the most important thing.

    This question is often used in therapy sessions to illustrate to an individual, couple or family just how polarizing the desire to “be right” can be.

     

  • By John Nelson

     “The air was now cool and salubrious, and riding seven or eight miles, through a pine forest, I came to Sapello bridge, to which the salt tide flows. I here stopped…”

                William Bartram, 1741, “Travels”

     

  •  Funerals are never easy events for me. They evoke multiple and mixed feelings. Loss and regret commingle with sorrow and blessing. Relief and sadness embrace. Tears flow as tender smiles erupt. Past and present merge into an unknown future. Cultural commands dictating appropriate behavior collide with an innate sense of rightness that opposes propriety.

  •  Rice has always been considered a natural convenience food. It’s easy to store and always ready to use … no washing, peeling or chopping required. Once opened, I keep mine in an airtight container in the pantry.

    I recently learned that brown rice should be stored in a refrigerator or freezer if you plan to keep it for more than a few months, due to the freshness of the oil contained in the bran layer. Cooked rice will usually hold up for a week if stored in the refrigerator in an airtight container or up to six months in the freezer.

     

  • Saturday will be the perfect day to get focused on health as The Brunswick Beacon’s 11th annual Beacon Health Expo takes place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 25 at Shallotte Middle School at 225 Village Road in Shallotte.

    Admission is free, and free childcare will be available.

    Featured are 64 vendors bringing a variety of free screenings and demonstrations, a seminar and information on an array of health-oriented topics.

    Participants include hospitals, dental offices, wellness centers, and hearing and eye care specialists.

  • Just when you thought Carolina basketball couldn’t get any more exciting, the Harlem Ambassadors trot into town to up everybody’s game.

    The team, specializing in cross-country and international roundball folly-and-fun fundraisers, take on the Calabash Lions Club Lions Pride team for an entertaining showdown at 4 p.m. Saturday, March 4, in the West Brunswick High School gymnasium at 550 Whiteville Road (N.C. 130) in Shallotte.

  • American folk singer, storyteller and autoharpist Adam Miller performs a free concert at 3 p.m. Thursday, March 2, at Hickmans Crossroads Library at 1040 Calabash Road. The accomplished folklorist, historian, musicologist and song collector, who has amassed a repertoire of more than 5,000 songs, accompanies his rich, resonant baritone voice with lively finger-picking on acoustic guitar and stunningly beautiful autoharp melodies. The program is open to the public. For more information call the library at 575-0173 or go to folksinging.org.