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Today's Features

  • How can you paint better water and skies?

    Award-winning landscape artist Joanne Geisel of Leland will show you how when she conducts Waterway Art Association’s first workshop for the 2014-15 season, “Painting the Landscape: Water and Skies,” from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 15, at Brunswick Senior Resources Inc., 3620 Express Drive in Shallotte.

  • Sure, there will be the usual pre-dawn sales and crowds and standing-in-line-till-you-drop.

    But this year on the day after Thanksgiving, local artist and yoga teacher Charlotte Ranz is also hoping Black Friday can slow down a bit and add a new dimension that includes giving instead of just buying.

    That’s the thought process behind Flood the Street with Art Black Friday, a worldwide movement offering free art for one day, which Ranz and fellow members of the Waterway Art Association are launching locally the day after Thanksgiving, Nov. 28, in Shallotte.

  • Three Brunswick County residents are among 15 artists of varied disciplines who have been named 2014-2015 Regional Artist Project Grant (RAPG) recipients.

    Announcement of the awards comes from the Arts Council of Wilmington and New Hanover County, in conjunction with arts councils in Brunswick and Columbus counties and with the support of the North Carolina Arts Council.

    This year’s grantees were selected from 49 applicants who

    requested more than $53,000 for $15,000 in available funds.

  •  Cheryle Jones Syracuse

    The food holidays will be here before we know it. Thanksgiving is just around the corner and I don’t need to remind you that about the many eating opportunities that will quickly follow. We make 200 food decisions every day. That’s in a normal day; just think of the decisions you’ll need to make during the holiday time. We can help make some of those food decisions good for you.

  •  Typically, my mornings begin with a cup of coffee and my devotional, “Give Us This Day,” followed by a trek to the computer to receive my electronic spiritual boost from the Center for Action and Contemplation, Father Richard Rohr’s site. His daily words seem always to be just what I need to read, hear, and heed. They were particularly spot on a week or so ago.

  •  By John Nelson

    A botanist living here in the sunny South sometimes feels the urge to tease his northern counterparts once it starts getting to be cold. Way up north, it always snows a lot in the winter, and all the plants are frozen. All the botanists will be tramping inside out of the snow, taking off their boots and furry parkas, settling into their nice warm herbarium, and poring over the specimens they collected all through the growing season, which is something like May through August, and they’ll be dreaming of a flowery landscape.

  •  When planning for your weekly meals, sometimes it’s more convenient to make some things ahead of time. This may be especially true for ground beef, especially if you plan on making some chili, casseroles, tacos or even spaghetti sauce during the week.

    Maybe it’s just me, but when browning ground beef, do you typically end up with large chunks that are hard to break down? Don’t you just hate that? Or maybe you just like it all chunky.

  •  Army Pvt. Aaron D. Harris has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson in Columbia, S.C.

    During the nine weeks of training, Harris studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches and field training exercises.

  •  Army Spc. David K. Lewis, son of David R. Lewis of Leland, has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson in Columbia, S.C.

  • SUPPLY — They recall circuit preachers and initial church gatherings inside an old house.

    In fact, when Sabbath Home Baptist Church got its start a century ago, it wasn’t even Baptist.

    The fledgling church began as an offshoot of Sharon Methodist Church. Now, a century later, members of the historic Baptist church are celebrating its 100th anniversary at a special 10 a.m. homecoming service this coming Sunday, Nov. 9, and the public is invited.