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Today's Features

  •  Every year during late spring and early summer, I get the same question from many pet parents: “Can my dog or cat get sick from ‘kissing bugs?’” The short answer is, “It’s extremely rare, but, yes, and you can get it, too.” The longer answer is, “Yes, but it’s really rare and incredibly complicated. There’s a little more to Chagas disease we need to discuss.” Let’s discuss kissing bugs, Chagas disease, and the potential threat they pose to dogs, cats and people.

  •  By Linda Arnold

    As I’ve been reflecting on this Father’s Day, I see lots of cases of happy family connections. I also see examples of strained relationships — and situations of raw emotions stemming from lost family members.

    Fathers and sons

  •  Pender County is hosting its 13th annual North Carolina Blueberry Festival this weekend Friday, June 17, and Saturday, June 18, in historic downtown Burgaw.

    Attracting more than 30,000 people annually on the third Saturday in June, the festival provides an opportunity for people to enjoy a full day of family entertainment, while experiencing the southern hospitality of a small town. More than 20 events ranging from entertainment to a car show, a street fair, recipe contest, barbecue cook-off, a 5K run and special exhibits are staged by more than 100 volunteers.

  • Durham-based artist Tony Alderman will present a showing of his series of paintings, “Varnamtown: An Aging Life,” on June 17 and 18 in Varnamtown Town Hall at 100 Varnamtown Road SW.

    The paintings depict the traditional North Carolina fishing culture of Varnamtown.

    The show will open with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, June 17, and continue through Saturday, June 18, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

  •  By John Nelson

    Allow me to brag a bit on my hometown. I live in Columbia, S.C., which is our state’s capital. It’s a reasonably big city, as Southern cities go, one that features plenty of history. Our city is filled with friendly people, tree-lined streets, great food, tons of theater, music, a big university, and of course, lots of politics, if that’s your thing.

  • By John Nelson

    Allow me to brag a bit on my hometown. I live in Columbia, S.C., which is our state’s capital. It’s a reasonably big city, as Southern cities go, one that features plenty of history. Our city is filled with friendly people, tree-lined streets, great food, tons of theater, music, a big university, and of course, lots of politics, if that’s your thing.

  • Perhaps the pace of the last few weeks has had its effect on me. Whenever I find myself racing from one event to another, one experience to another, my spirit feels the tug of stressfulness. It’s a good thing because I am once again led into the reality that life is more than a rush into activity. I discover anew … and will continue to do so, I am sure … the need for solitude as a means of entry into serenity.

  • Music at the Sunset Beach Waterfront Market launches this Thursday, June 9, featuring local favorite and Paddlefest entertainer Ashton Stanley, along with other local talent providing music from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The waterfront market team is hoping to offer music at the weekly market through Labor Day. The market is open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday.

  • OCEAN ISLE BEACH — Just when you thought there was nothing new under the almost-summer sun, Shallotte River Swamp Park adds new venues for 2016.

    The year-old zip-line and nature-oriented eco-park at 5550 Watts Road off Ocean Isle Beach Road is launching into its second season with the addition of an elevated walkway and alligator containment park.

    The park is also adding turtle and birds-of-prey presentations and, starting June 13, snake shows.

  • Harold Melvin’s legendary Blue Notes and Blue Magic are featured performers at a Father’s Day Mega Concert set for 7:30 p.m. at Odell Williamson Auditorium on the main campus of Brunswick Community College, 50 College Road in Bolivia.

    The Blue Light Basement Concert Series event, sponsored by Men of Respect and Ladies of Distinction, includes a free buffet. Doors open at 6 p.m.

    Harold Melvin and The Blue Notes were and still are a charismatic Philly band whose roots date back to 1954 — long before their leap into stardom during the 1970s.