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Today's Features

  • The time is here for planting trees and shrubs. Review your existing trees at this time. Damaged and diseased trees should be cut down, but we need to think about the value of trees in our environment.

    Trees help provide oxygen, keep our soils from eroding, and keep our yards shady and beautiful. Just remember, if you take down a tree, please replant one or two in its place.

    When it comes to planting trees, there are some vital steps that must be taken to ensure the tree you plant will successfully grow and provide years of shade and pleasure.

  • It is so easy to sing songs of praise and thanksgiving when all is going well. It’s not even that difficult when we perceive this is as good as it gets.

    Typically, at Thanksgiving services, we pause to render gratitude for all that God has done in us and with us and through us and for us during the past year. We conjure up memories of all the wonderful happenings we have experienced, the glorious graces we have received. And then we pray our appreciation.

  • “It’s all about the family and the views,” Island Home Tour homeowners agree. That’s why they built their homes.

    They have agreed to open their homes for the Island Home Tour because they want to support the Museum of Coastal Carolina and its contribution to education, environment and entertainment for the area.

    The home tour takes place from 3-5 p.m. on Dec. 5 followed by an Island Good Time reception and auction at the museum from 5-7 p.m.

    Bell House

  • Praise the Lord and pass the biscuits—Sundays are “world famous” gospel brunch days at the House of Blues in North Myrtle Beach, S.C.

    Every Sunday from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the entertainment venue at 4640 U.S. 17 S., the brunch crowd is served an extra heaping helping of food and live gospel music.

    While feasting on an amazing buffet to feed body and soul, diners are treated to a live performance by gospel trio Glory.

  • I have been writing this food column for almost four and a half years now, and recently a friend of mine asked me how I came up with all my ideas to write about each week. I told him I had this long checklist made up of possible food articles and I just checked them off week after week. I probably had enough for 10 years! “Really?” he said.

  • It’s a satisfying meal that warms you up on a chilly winter day. Soup can be good for you and, best of all, it’s easy to make. Now that fall is here, soup is the perfect way to “warm up” after coming in from the cool, evening air.

    Whether you choose soup or chili, these fall comfort foods can include whatever ingredients you like. They are easy to make and can be made in large batches, if you choose, for tasty leftovers. We all know that soups taste better the second day, anyway.

  • The Palm Reader (compiled by the Southeastern Palm and Exotic Plant Society) indicates “not all plants that look like palms are palms.”

    In everyday speech, the term “palm” can refer to just about any large-leafed evergreen bush or tree. One non-palm that really looks like a palm is the Sago Palm (Cycas revolute), commonly sold in coastal areas of the Southeast. The Sago Palm is actually a cycad. Cycads are an ancient group of plants that are closely related to cone-bearing trees such as pine and spruce.

  • I’m sure I have too much time to think when I’m riding around in the pick-up truck. Recently, I was pondering just how strange it is that the New Orleans Saints are undefeated (at least at this writing).

    I remember when Archie Manning was exiled to the Big Easy from Ole’ Miss to quarterback for the then-new expansion franchise. Now, at least one of his sons is destined for Canton, Ohio. I guess that just means I’m getting old.

  • Halloween’s bags of candy are scarcely garnered by trick or treaters, young and old, when turkey sales hit the scene.

    Pumpkins for pies replace those that decorated doorsteps. At the same time, department and grocery store workers race to remove the vestiges of both holidays to make room for all things Christmas.

    Red and green become the favored colors instead of shades of orange and brown. I watch it all and wonder what ever happened to Advent. Does anyone even recognize its presence?

  • The Brunswick Community College Foundation and Coastal Financial Associates are bringing renowned violinist Caroline Goulding accompanied on piano by Alicja Basinska and Janine Randall, with special guests The Sea Notes Choral Society of Brunswick County, to Odell Williamson Auditorium at 6 p.m. Jan. 9.

    All proceeds from the event will benefit student scholarships at Brunswick Community College. General admission tickets are $25 and VIP tickets, including a post-show reception and priority reserved seating, are $50.