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Today's Features

  • Etta M. Little, wife of the late James (Jim) Little, celebrates her 90th birthday on Feb. 13 at New Life Baptist Church Fellowship

    Hall. She has three children: James Maurice Little (deceased), Christine L. Vereen and Thelma Faye Little; three grandchildren: Cheryl V. Luke, James Brian Little and Whitney Maurice Little; and three great-grandchildren: Alexander V. Luke, Jenna Madison Little and James Brian Little II.

  • STAFF REPORT

    “Zula Patrol: Under the Weather,” is the featured Sky Theater program for stargazers of all ages during March through May at Ingram Planetarium in Sunset Beach.

    Join the team from the planet Zula as they use the pet Gorga to collect and learn about weather here on Earth and across the solar system.

    Catch this show at 3 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays at the planetarium at 7625 High Market St. in The Village at Sunset Beach.

  • How did casseroles get to be so popular? Although it seems they’ve been around forever, casseroles didn’t really attract attention until condensed, canned soups came on the market in the ’50s. The casserole was an American staple during the Depression, when families needed cheap, filling meals to put on the table.

    Do we only make casseroles because they are convenient? Is there really any reason to make a casserole?

  • BY LAURA LEWIS

    STAFF WRITER

    SUPPLY—As James Bell ascended winding wooden steps with a boxful of food for a family in need, his wife, the Rev. Patricia Ann Bell, urged everyone to go ahead of her.

    Health problems have slowed her gait, and it takes her a while to climb stairs, she said.

    But when it comes to community outreach, the shepherdess of Lamb of God Ministries still gets around just fine.

    The newly ordained minister’s church doesn’t yet have a building of its own.

  • This pelican was trying to stay warm as it waited for the snow to melt Feb. 13 at the Calabash waterfront. 

  • Gardeners from cooler climates often wax nostalgic for that hedge of sweet-smelling lilacs or the stately rhododendron that anchored Grandma’s garden.

    Attempts to re-create these memories in the hot and humid climate of southeastern North Carolina are generally met with frustration and failure.

    Rather than lamenting over that which cannot be, let’s look at some of the wonderful things about gardening here.

    Winter blooms

  • One of the things that amazed me when I first came to Brunswick County as a permanent resident was the number of controlled fires that are created in our area. So, I decided to find out what these fires are all about.

  • I am not an electrical engineer nor do I understand what electricity is all about. My knowledge is limited to the ability to “plug it in” and believe all will work well. But, I do know everything stops moving, all appliances immediately arrest activity, fans and lights go off, when a transformer is struck by lightning.

  • My introduction to cheese while growing up was limited to sliced American cheese, packaged cream cheese and that little jar of pimento cheese spread that everybody had. It wasn’t until I was much older that I was introduced to the world of “real” cheeses like Gouda, Edam, Swiss, mozzarella, Roquefort, Camembert and Brie.

    Brie cheese is not usually associated with the soup pot, probably due to its appearance and the fact it might not be, to some, the proper use of such a celebrated cheese.

  • CIS and Brunswick County Parks and Recreation teamed up for the second annual ball to benefit CIS programs Saturday afternoon.

    More than 130 girls from kindergarten to fifth-grade attended, escorted by their fathers, grandfathers, uncles and other male role models. The event was at the Brunswick Center in Southport, the newest senior center for Brunswick Senior Resources Inc.