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Today's Features

  •  Brunswick County Literacy Council is the recipient of a team project as part of Leadership Brunswick County, a nine-month program jointly sponsored by the Brunswick Community College, Brunswick County, North Brunswick and the Southport-Oak Island Area chambers of commerce.

    Graduation ceremonies took place at the Odell Williamson Auditorium Events Center on May 19. 

    Brunswick County Literacy Council board president Mari-Lou Wong-Chong and vice president Gene Vasile were on hand to cheer the graduates and especially the BCLC team.

  • The North Carolina 4-H Photo Contest is open to all North Carolina youth ages 9-18. Participants do not have to be current members of 4-H.
    The purpose of this exhibition is to provide a showcase of youths’ photographic accomplishments.

  • Brunswick County 4-H, sponsored by the North Carolina Cooperative Extension, will offer a variety of activities, field trips and day camps for children ages 5-19 through the Exploring the World of 4-H Summer Enrichment Program beginning June 11.
    Registration can be made through the Cooperative Extension 4-H office in person or online or via mail. For links to the catalog of activities, visit www.brunswick.ces.ncsu.edu.

  • Japanese beetles and other summer beetles will soon be busy chewing plants. The Master Gardeners will respond to many calls concerning these beetles. Let’s look at these evil critters.
    Adult Japanese beetles live for about four to six weeks, lay eggs and die. The rest of the year, the beetles live underground in a grub stage. These plump, C-shaped white grubs literally turn up in gardens when the soil is tilled in the spring. They feed on the roots of grass and other plants before maturing into adult beetles the next summer.
    Adults can fly in and out

  • Healthcare legislation has dominated news coverage for the last few months. The health of your lawn is a bit less controversial but almost as important to lots of home gardeners.
    Some folks make fertilizing the lawn more complicated than the intricacies of the latest government budget proposal, but it doesn’t have to be that way.

  • All relatives, friends and families of the George Washington Lewis and Lydia Ann Hewett family are invited to the 30th family reunion at 1 p.m. Sunday, June 6, at the Senior Center, 308 Cape Fear Blvd. in Carolina Beach.
    There will be a covered dish dinner.
    For more details, call David Lewis at 842-7972 or Grover Holden at 842-8313.
     

  • Here are lunch menus for Brunswick County’s nine Senior Nutrition Sites for next week.
    Monday, May 31
    Closed.
    Tuesday, June 1
    Beef stew with vegetable, brown rice, blend juice, vanilla pudding, dinner roll/margarine, beverage.
    Wednesday, June 2
    Pork cutlet/gravy, sweet potatoes, turnip greens, pears, whole-wheat bread/margarine, beverage.
    Thursday, June 3
    Turkey tettrazini, field peas, peaches, dinner roll/margarine, beverage.
    Friday, June 4

  • This June will be the 10th annual observance of National Safety Month, originated by the National Safety Council in an effort to promote public awareness and ultimately decrease the number of injuries and deaths.
    Kitchen fires kill hundreds of people and injure thousands every year in this country. According to the National Fire Protection Association, cooking is the leading cause of home fires and home fire injuries in this country. Whether you are cooking outside on the grill or inside in your kitchen, it is important to pay close attention to what you are doing.

  • At this time of year, you can find two constellations that represent two legendary heroes; one in the east and one in the west. Heroes to the left of us and heroes to the right; here we are stuck in the middle again.
    During the merry, merry month of May, we are in between two star figures that are probably the most well known constellations. Here is the story of these two legends and without any more corny song references.

  • Until recently, students at Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary School were unfamiliar with the idea of up-cycling.
    Up-cycling, as explained by Albe Zakes of TerraCycle, is “the process of taking non-recyclable material that can’t be traditionally recycled and finding a way to directly re-purpose it into a new product. By doing that, you’re giving it a new life cycle thus you’re up-cycling it.”