.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • This is a good time to review the planets; they have been on the move through the sky so it is time for a sky-wide planet roundup.

    We are losing Jupiter; well not really losing it, we are just losing sight of it.

    Jupiter is moseying into the sunset as the days pass. At least it looks that way, “danger science information ahead,” as Earth orbits the sun, we change the alignment of Jupiter and the sun in the sky. As we move, the effect is the alignment of the sun between Jupiter and us.

  • We’ve just emerged from a stint of colder-than-normal temperatures that we’ve been sharing with most of the country. I don’t know about you, but I could use a little mid-winter pick-me-up, a reminder that our short and relatively mild winter will be giving way to spring shortly.

    Luckily, all I have to do is go and hang out in the backyard to find winter-blooming plants like hybrid mahonia and edgeworthia.

  • As many plants wind down for the year, camellias come in to their own. The glossy, deep green Southern aristocrats brighten the cool season with perfect blooms. We mainly grow two camellia species here: camellia sasanqua, a fall bloomer, and camellia japonica, the “common” camellia that flowers in late fall to spring, depending on the variety.

  • Ashley Elaine Suggs of Calabash and Justin Darrell Ward of Sunset Beach were married Dec. 24 at Lighthouse Mission Church in Calabash.

    The Rev. Larry Ward officiated the ceremony.

    The bride is the daughter of David and Susan Suggs of Calabash. She was given in marriage by her parents and escorted by her father.

    The groom is the son of Vicki Cayton of Castle Hayne and the late Darrell Ward.

    Mateus Buchanan of Calabash served as matron of honor.

    Flower girl was Mackenzie Buchanan.

    David Suggs, the bride’s father, served as best man.

  • When I stumbled upon a transliteration of the beatitudes by Dr. Neil Douglas-Klotz, an Aramaic scholar, in his “Prayers of the Cosmos,” I was struck with awe.

  • SUNSET BEACH—When her grandchildren were small, Anne Giordano used to make up stories to tell them.

    The retired educator’s gift for fictitious license recently re-emerged in the form of a new children’s book, “Spencer, the Magic Rabbit.”

    It’s a freshly published collaboration between Giordano and fellow Sea Trail resident and illustrator Marie Munn.

    Noting it’s her first book, Giordano said “Spencer” is the print rendition of a story she used to tell her granddaughter, Kellie.

  • Shallotte now has its own celestial venue for convivial pursuits.

    Planet Fun, at 349 Whiteville Road, is a newly opened venue for fun-seekers of all ages.

    Highlights in the 50,000-square-foot entertainment center, beside Lowe’s Home Improvement, include the 32-lane constellation bowling alley, four lanes of mini bowling, a two-story laser tag arena, nine-hole black-light miniature golf, a soft indoor playground, arcade, party rooms, concession stand, pro shop and a restaurant, the Starz Grille.

  • When Pete and Linda Sundman, married and business partners for the past 20 years, moved from Atlanta to Brunswick County, they wanted to find a way to put their entrepreneurial skills to use.

    They’ve finally found their niche in a unique little drama venue on N.C. 211, and local theater fans are celebrating.

    The two, who have lived in Oak Island, St. James and now Winding River Plantation, tried retirement but found it wasn’t for them.

  • KURE BEACH—In January 1865, more than 3,000 United States Colored Troops (USCT) landed at Fort Fisher and participated in the Union Army campaign to take Wilmington.

    The impact of their presence will be reviewed when Fort Fisher State Historic Site has a panel discussion, “Black Men Bearing Freedom: U.S. Colored Troops and Their Impact on North Carolina,” at 6 p.m. Friday, Jan. 15, in the Azalea Coast Room at the Fisher Student Center at UNC Wilmington.

  • If you speak Spanish, the word to describe the weather of late is “freo.” That’s “cold” to those of you who don’t “habla the Espanola.”

    Whatever your language of choice, the temperatures have been abnormally low. So what does the cold mean for our garden plants?

    The short answer to that question is: “Not too much.” While the temperatures haven’t been pleasant for those of us who prefer the feel of sweat rolling down our backs, the plants are doing just fine.