Today's Features

  • By Mark Jankowski

    Ingram Planetarium senior engineer

    Autumn has sprung. Wait a minute. Can autumn spring? Well, maybe I should say autumn has fallen. The temperatures do not reflect the change of seasons but daylight is growing shorter, school buses are on the road again, and stores have winter coats on display. That is just the change here on the ground.

  • The town of Carolina Shores will have a website photo contest to replace the generic photos now on the town’s homepage.

    The deadline for entering a photo is Oct. 15. Judging of contest entries will be completed on Nov. 1 at the Town Hall workshop. A $25 Food Lion gift certificate will be awarded to the four winners.

    Pictures must be taken within the town of Carolina Shores borders and should show recognizable features within the town and also tell a story.

  • Church sponsors faith, music cruise

    Faith Building Missions is sponsoring a faith and music cruise for June 20-24, 2011.

    Enjoy a four-day excursion on a Royal Caribbean luxury liner to Nassau, Bahamas. Relax and enjoy a great time of bonding and encouragement joining other Christians in hearing speakers and worship bands.

  • In 2006, a documentary film, “Inconvenient Truth,” was presented at the Sundance Film Festival. To date, its message about global warming and the effects of climate change is both upsetting and challenging. It continues to be alternately accepted and denied as inconvenient truth. 

  • April Dawn Holleman of Kure Beach and Adam Wesley Rogerson of Supply were married Sept. 18 at sunrise on Wrightsville Beach.

    The Rev. Tracy Pryor officiated the ceremony.

    The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John S. Holleman Jr. of Leland. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Billy Rogerson of Roanoke Rapids.

    The bride was given in marriage and escorted by her father.

    Misty Nichols of Kernersville, the bride’s cousin, served as matron of honor. 

    Billy Rogerson, the groom’s father, served as best man.

  • Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Pauline H. Smith and David D. Garrett of Shallotte. The bride-elect is the daughter of Paul E. Harris Sr. of New Bern. She is a graduate of Elizabeth City State University in Elizabeth. The prospective groom is the son of Brenda Garrett of Manning, S.C. He is a graduate of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. An Oct. 2 wedding is planned at Sunset Beach. Family and friends are invited to a reception at the Calabash Fire Department in Calabash at 3 p.m.

  • Ralph and Sandra Yaun of Leland celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on Sept. 10 at the First Baptist Church activity center in Wilmington. The couple was married on Sept. 10, 1960, at the Calypso Presbyterian Church in Calypso. Hosting the party were the couple’s children and grandchild, son Chris Yaun and wife Shari of Leland, granddaughter Emily Kathleen Yaun and daughter Rebecca Angela Yaun of Leland. Numerous friends and relatives were also in attendance.

  • There have been several calls on the information line in the last couple of weeks complaining about insect problems. Following are some common pests and solutions:

    Bedding plants and perennials provide the homeowner and landscaper with a multitude of colors and textures. Unfortunately, numerous insects, mites and other invertebrates (i.e. slugs, sowbugs and millipedes) consider these same plants as food. 

  • Leave the 10W-30 for the guys down at the auto service center. We’re talking about the horticultural oils lots of us use to control scales, spider mites, aphids, whiteflies, mealybugs and other critters. 

    Ever wonder what the difference is between “summer oil” and “dormant oil”? How about “superior” and “supreme”? Let’s try to clear up some of the confusion.

  • ‘Shipwrecks’ book released

    Local authors Fred David and Vern Bender have released a new book “Shipwreck Diving Southeast North Carolina: Calabash to Southport.” 

    The book features stories and pictures about ships that have sunk offshore this area since the early 1800s.