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Today's Features

  • Tabitha and Brian Townsend of Ash are the parents of a daughter, Riley-Grace Caroline Townsend, born at 9:48 a.m. Sept. 30 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    She weighed 7 pounds, 4 ounces and measured 21 inches long. She joins sisters Brooke Leigh, 6, and Hailee, 4.

    Maternal grandfather is Rex Inman of Ash.

    Paternal grandparents are Brenda Yovanoich of Polkton and the late Bobby Stewart Townsend.

  • Weeks have now elapsed since my unfortunate fall. And all is not yet well.

    My first response to the dilemma was quite positive, I believe. Adjustment to being joined at the hip to an obliging mate came with a fair degree of ease. I convinced myself the persistent presence would be both beneficial and reassuring. I could do this. It might take some effort, but it was not beyond my reach... or stretch.

  • Antoine’s Restaurant in New Orleans, established in 1840 by Alciatore Antoine, is the country’s oldest family-run restaurant.

    It is the birthplace of oyster’s Rockefeller, so named by Jules Antoine (son of the restaurant’s owner) for the richness of the sauce. It remains one of the great culinary creations of all time and that original recipe remains a closely guarded Antoine’s secret…though it has been imitated countless times.

  • The Hawaiian Islands, once called “The Sandwich Islands,” were named after John Montagu, the Fourth Earl of Sandwich, for whom the sandwich we eat today was named.

  • Every once in a while I get a craving for some split pea soup. I like to make it with some fresh cut bacon, chopped onions, celery, carrots, garlic, chicken stock. and of course, some dried, green split peas. If I have any pieces of ham in the fridge, I might add some of that.

  •  Brunswick County residents came out to celebrate diversity Sunday, Oct. 4, at the fifth annual Brunswick County Intercultural Festival. The festival was at Brunswick Community College and featured song, dance, food and crafts that celebrated the world's cultures.

  • Check the fall 2009 edition of Signature Kitchens and Baths, and the magazine’s design awards first-place winner in the traditional category might look familiar.

    The winner was Windsor’s Cabinetry in Greensboro, which also has an office in Shallotte that has installed cabinets in numerous homes in Brunswick County communities such as Seascape, Seawatch, St. James, River’s Edge and Holden and Ocean Isle beaches.

    In fact, the Shallotte team’s work has been featured in three local award-winning homes in previous Brunswick County Parades of Homes.

  • CALABASH—Sunset River Marketplace is hosting the 64th annual Watercolor Society of North Carolina (WSNC) Juried Exhibition from Oct. 11 to Nov. 30.

    An opening reception will be held from 2-4 p.m. this coming Sunday, Oct. 11, at the gallery at 10283 Beach Drive SW in Calabash.

    The juror for this year’s competition and guest artist is Steve Rogers of Ormond Beach, Fla.

    In addition to judging entries, Rogers is conducting a four-day watercolor workshop Oct. 12-15 at Sunset River Studio, the gallery’s workshop on Calabash Road.

  • On Oct. 9, the moon will get a new crater. The crater will not come from the normal source, such as a meteor hitting the surface. This time the crater will be an artificial depression.

    The crater will be just a bit of cosmic surgery on the face of the old man in the moon, just below his chin.

    The real reason for the new crater is to answer the age-old question: “Just how much water is on the moon?” The estimated quantity of water is believed to be 32 ounces per ton of top layer soil; equating to the driest Earth desert.

  • You can tie the landscape together with short, squat trees. Another problem commonly encountered when designing small spots is finding a way to provide low, space-conscious structure with trees that carry the bulk of their mass below eye level.

    These trees are often important in tying together the landscape and connecting it to water features, garden art, and hardscaping. Their low visual center of gravity—typically from squat or weeping shapes­—makes this possible.