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Today's Features

  • The summer’s sky is full of many bright stars. The reason is simple: At the start of summer, the main plane of the Milky Way Galaxy is just above the horizon, and as the calendar approaches the middle of the summer season, the Milky Way’s main plane moves to the middle of the sky.

    More stars are along the main plane than below or above the plane; therefore, it is the position of the main plane that fills the sky with stars.

  • Artists from throughout the Carolinas, from the mountains to the coast, have brought their paintings and pottery to downtown Southport’s Franklin Square Gallery for its annual Summer Regional Show that opened June 21 and continues until July 17.

    This juried exhibition highlights the work of already well known artists in Brunswick and New Hanover counties and many others from throughout North and South Carolina.

  •      Visitors are invited to drill with Capt. William Dry’s Militia Company at Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson State Historic Site on Saturday, June 19. 

    Al Denn will demonstrate 18th century apothecary and surgery in Colonial America and Albert Shaw will display Colonial weapons and demonstrate Colonial surveying.

  •   Communities in Schools (CIS) awarded $1,000 scholarships to 15 graduating seniors at all Brunswick County high schools during this year’s senior awards ceremony.

    Recipients were interviewed and scored based on academics, school activities, community involvement, financial need and interview presentation. 

    CIS partners with local businesses, industries, civic clubs, agencies, communities of faith and individuals to provide these scholarships.

  • Brunswick Community College recently had four faculty members intern at five local business/agencies as a part of its College Tech Prep Faculty Internship Program.

    The program helps faculty members gain firsthand experience with new technology, gives them the opportunity to bring new knowledge into classrooms and bridges the gap between the education system and the business sector.

  • I cried when I first viewed 99 power-packed minutes of “Wit,” a Pulitzer Prize-winning play by Margaret Edson made into a 2001 HBO movie.
    I thought my tears would end with the final scene of the movie that tracked the last days of Vivian Bearing, Phd., a professor of English whose academic life revolved about the works of John Donne, particularly the holy sonnet “Death Be Not Proud.” But, I was wrong! Tears flowed as abundantly when I saw the film again, this time with my companion chaplains at Brunswick Community Hospital.

  • In today’s economic downturn, the word retirement has little meaning for older adults in the state. For many, it means taking a part-time job after they leave the full-time workforce. Others expect to prolong retirement because of financial and insurance needs
    North Carolina leaders have a plan for the 25 percent or 2.4 million retiring “Boomers” who may choose to continue to work. This issue was the main topic discussed during the North Carolina Senior Tar Heel Legislature (STHL) meeting.

  • Tommy and Ruth Hawks of Winston-Salem celebrated their 50th anniversary June 13. The couple was married in 1960 and bought their first beach home at Holden Beach in 1989. They have three children and three grandchildren.

  • Amanda Fulford of Shallotte and Frederick Clements of Southport were married May 14 at United Vision Petecostal Church.
    The Rev. Maurice Milligan officiated the service.
    The bride is the daughter of Randy and Janis Fulford of Shallotte. She was given in marriage by her parents.
    The groom is the son of James and Sabrina Clements of Southport.
    Miranda Crouch of Shallotte, the bride’s sister, served as matron of honor. Cortney Mills of Myrtle Beach, S.C., served as bridesmaid.

  • The line of school buses at the Brunswick County Government Complex was a sight to see last Thursday, June 10, as they made their way back to the garage to be parked for summer. It was a sure sign school is officially out.
    As the 4-H staff noticed them outside their office windows, it reminded them the Brunswick County summer fun “Exploring the World of 4-H” program would begin in less than 24 hours.