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Today's Features

  • Miller Pope, one of the founders of Sea Trail Resort and Conference Center in Sunset Beach, led a colorful life as a big-city freelance illustrator, businessman and world-traveling family man before finding his family’s “paradise” in Brunswick County in the 1970s.

    Now, he’s the owner of his own Island Press publishing house on Ocean Isle Beach and is in the business of writing books—specifically about what he’s learned about art, history and life in the 80 years of he’s watched the world change around him.

  • If you haven’t already figured it out, southeastern North Carolina is one of the worst places in the world to grow turf grasses. We sometimes have winter temperatures that cause injury to warm-season grasses like centipede and St. Augustine. It’s just too blasted hot in the summer for even the most heat-tolerant, cool-season grasses like tall fescue to survive. Throw in weeds, ground pearls, high pH, large patch, dollar spot, chinch bugs and all of the other issues and you have tough turf growing conditions.

  • Heat indexes are high and causing plants to flop from the hot dry “oven-like air.” Be sure to check your watering needs for your plants especially any new plantings. Here are some other timely tips for this time of year:

    Pruning

    For additional flowering, deadheading some of your favorite flowers now may force them to bloom again in the fall.

  • I am not talking about lawn here; I am talking about keeping our gardens free of unnecessary chemicals, saving energy and capturing and storing carbon. Extra water consumption, fertilizers and pesticides routinely used to coddle gardens account for large amounts of energy use along with carbon emissions. There are many simple and fairly easy steps we can all take to save energy and capture and store carbon in our gardens. The cool part of this endeavor is that we will also be lowering our energy bills as well as our physical labor.

  • Josh and Emily Burcham of Shallotte are the parents of a daughter, Emma Ann Burcham, born at 9:45 a.m. June 29 at Betty Clemons Wemont Children’s Hospital.

    She weighed 6 pounds, 12 ounces and measured 20 inches long.

    Maternal grandparents are John and Juli Rhodes of Shallotte and Tim and Tommy King of Ohio.

    Paternal grandparents are Kimberly and Bobby Burcham of Shallotte.

    Great-grandparents are Emma Sonborn, Sue Sowers and Donnie Sowers, all of Ohio, Becky and Charlie Ray Singleton Jr. of Bullock, and Barbara and Johnnie Ray Gore of Winnabow.

  • Amanda Knight and Jared Berry of Supply are the parents of a daughter, Faye Elizabeth Berry, born at 2:23 p.m. June 7 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    She weighed 8 pounds, 2 ounces and measured 20 inches long.

    Maternal grandparents are Michelle Bifano and Dennis Knight of North Carolina.

    Paternal grandmother is Tina Bowen of South Carolina.

    Great-grandparents are Sharon Knight and Dennis Knight of Supply and Joan Bowen and Nick Bowen of South Carolina.

    Great-great-grandparents are Leo and Louise Hewett of Supply.

  • When my granddaughter decided on a solo visit with the “old folks,” she likely had no idea what would occur. Neither did we!

    The ground rules were set by Grandmother Dear. First of all, the distinction was made between a visit and a vacation. It was clarified that visiting meant entering into the lives of the host family. Vacationing meant filling the time with fun things to do and see.

  • On Saturday more than 70 kids participated in the Kids Fishing Derby at the Oak Island Pier. The event was sponsored by the Oak Island Parks and Recreation Department.

    Kids were given awards for the largest fish, smallest fish, skinnest fish, ugliest fish, shiniest fish and most fish caught. Those who did not catch any fish were able to participate in a drawing for prizes. The prizes awarded included fishing rods with popular themes such as Cars, Batman, Barbie, Hannah Montana and Superman.

  • If camp is under way, it must be summertime at the North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher.

    The state aquarium is just a ferry-cross over the Cape Fear River from Brunswick County.

    Summer activities on tap have included junior naturalists, animal keepers and coastal crusaders camps for children and teens (advance fees and registration required).

    Day visitors of all ages are offered a chance to experience the sights and sounds of “The Waters of the Cape Fear,” from freshwater streams and swamps to coastline habitats, to reefs and the open ocean.

  • Ticker (ID No. A008445) is a black-and-white male domestic shorthair. He has been at the shelter since June 17. The shelter’s adoption fees for female cats and kittens is $55, which includes physical exam, feline leukemia/FIV (feline HIV) tests, rabies vaccination and spay surgery. Adoption fees for male cats and kittens are $35, which includes physical exam, feline leukemia/FIV test, rabies vaccination and neuter surgery. The shelter, at 429 Green Swamp Road (N.C. 211) in Supply, is open to the public for viewing animals and adoptions from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.