Today's Features

  •  Veterans in the Bolivia area can enroll in the VA healthcare system, receive health screenings and health information, and find out about various services available to them through the Veterans Health Administration from representatives of the Fayetteville VA Medical Center.

    The center’s Rural Health Team will be set up in the Brunswick County Cooperative Extension’s training/conference room from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 19.

  •  A Brunswick County 4-H’er was among award-winners at the recent 2010 State 4-H Congress July 19-22 in Raleigh.

    Congress is the high point of the 4-H year, bringing young people from across the state to the North Carolina State University campus for four days of activity. At the beginning of summer, youth gather at their 4-H District Activity Day events to give presentations on topics of their choice to a panel of judges. Winners advance to the state level, where they gather during the second day of Congress.

  •  Five Brunswick County 4-H members completed the Golden Ray Series of the Junior Master Gardener Program during 4-H Summer Fun.

    Participants Eliza Douglass, Jessica Hockett, Jacob Cheers, London Robinson and Nickolas Dinnall received certificates for completion of the program. Master Gardener 4-H volunteers Grace Wrigley, Sharon Benson and Mercy McCurdy led the special interest group.

  •  Kendrick Morgan of Brunswick County was honored with a $2,000 scholarship at the annual North Carolina 4-H Scholarship and Awards Reception and Partnership Luncheon on Wednesday, July 21, at the Jane S. McKimmon Center on the North Carolina State University campus in Raleigh.

  • Nitrogen fertility has a significant impact on large patch development. High nitrogen levels promote the growth of soft, succulent leaves that are susceptible to attack by the large patch fungus. To help prevent disease outbreaks, apply a low rate of nitrogen fertilizer at 4 to 8-week intervals or use a slow-release nitrogen source to maintain an even growth rate. To reduce disease outbreaks during the winter and early spring, avoid fall applications of nitrogen fertilizer. Finally, maintain phosphorus and potash fertility levels according to soil test recommendations. In addition:

  •  You know there is no better teacher than experience, although it often makes for expensive lessons. One thing I love about my job is having this forum to tell you about my gardening experiences, so here we go with a summer plant performance update for 2010.

    Zoysia grasses have received lots of breeding interest in the last 10 years or so. That extra work is beginning to pay some dividends for anyone who tries to grow a decent lawn in this challenging area we call home. 

  •  U.S. Cellular plans to kick off the school year with the return of Calling All Teachers, a campaign that donates $1 million to fund creative and impactive classroom projects submitted by public school teachers. 

    Through Sept. 15, teachers are invited to register on DonorsChoose.org as a “U.S. Cellular Teacher” and post their requests to be considered for funding. So far, more than 1,490 teachers have signed up.

  •  Communities in Schools of Brunswick County Inc. (CIS) provides the Adopt-A-School and Volunteer Program to Brunswick County Schools to enhance the quality of education by bringing the community and its resources to the children. 

    Through business, church, agency and civic group partnerships brokered for each individual school, CIS helps schools in their efforts to provide a better education for the children of Brunswick County.

  • Here are lunch menus for Brunswick County’s nine Senior Nutrition Sites for next week.

    Monday, Aug. 30

    Stew beef au jus, mashed potatoes, green peas, Jell-O, apple juice, whole-wheat bread/margarine, beverage.

    Tuesday, Aug. 31

    Chicken/dumplings, pickled beets, peaches, biscuit/margarine, beverage.

    Wednesday, Sept. 1

    Pork cutlet/gravy, sweet potatoes, turnip greens, pears, whole-wheat bread/margarine, beverage.

    Thursday, Sept. 2

  •  It seems as though olives have been around since the beginning of time. Grown throughout most of the world, the Mediterranean area is home to almost 90 percent of the world’s olive trees.

    From the beginning, the calming and healing properties of olive oil has been recognized, which may account for the olive branch having long been used as a symbol of peace.