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Today's Features

  • The Henry Cannon Smith and Jesse Long reunion will be from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, March 17, at the Senior Building behind Waccamaw School in Ash. Lunch will be served at noon. Bring your family history, old photographs and a covered dish.
    A Henry Cannon Smith picture will be on display.
    A collection will be taken for a grave marker.
    For more information, call Virginia at 653-3445 or Faye at 770-1140.

  • SHALLOTTE—London Gore may be 88, but he doesn’t know much about slowing down.

    The World War II U.S. Army veteran still plays and wins regular games of pool at the Shallotte Senior Center.

    “I’ve done really good lately,” he said. “I just hold the table till I’m worn out, and then I have to quit.”

    This past Monday, “I held out for over an hour this morning,” Gore said. “We’ve got some real good players up there.”

  • Do you yearn to know what’s in your future, coupled with a little magic?

    Then Psychic ALX is your ticket.

    The nationally known psychic and entertainer will come to Sea Trail Golf Resort & Convention Center next Friday, March 16, to “read” his audience and entertain them with magic.

    “It’s a higher form of feeling,” ALX said this week in a phone interview.

    Psychic abilities are his talent. Magic, he says, employs the principles he uses.

  • Precinct meeting set for March 6
    The N.C. Democratic Party has declared that all precincts should conduct their annual precinct meeting at 6 p.m. March 6 at the Brunswick County Democratic Party Headquarters, 1420 Old Ocean Highway in Bolivia.

  • Trinity UMC sets March 4 services
    “The Apprentice Mary Magdalene” will be the title of the Rev. Jeff Roberts’ and associate pastor Michelle Sabin’s sermons on Sunday, March 4, at Trinity United Methodist Church, 209 E. Nash St. in Southport.
    Based on scripture from Luke 8:1-2, this is the second in a sermon series titled “The Apprentice,” based on the TV series, a look at some of the followers of Jesus.

  • This review began as a personal sense of honor since I was asked by the publisher to do it. That gave way, I must confess, to a growing interest in the topic and the manner in which it was presented.

  • By Myra Burgess
    Family Nutrition Program Assistant
    Expanded Foods & Nutrition Program
    Brunswick County Cooperative Extension

  • By Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension
    Brunswick County Center

  • By Tom Woods
    Master Gardener
    As we deal with nutrient management laws and high nitrogen prices, we sometimes lose track of just why we really use fertilizers to produce crops.
    We know we need them because the soil sample results tell us to apply them. We know adequate fertility leads to improved yields, but why? We have spent so much time looking at the negative aspects of fertilizer that I thought it might be enjoyable to look at why a nutrient like potassium is needed by plants.

  • Everyone can relate to that feeling of panic after making a cut and realizing you’ve just ruined the shape of your shrub.
    Or perhaps you have ignored a plant’s obvious structure problem because you were afraid or unsure of what pruning action to take.
    I continue to see poor pruning decisions throughout the county. The other day after teaching a class on proper pruning techniques, I came home to a neighbor topping their crape myrtles. Why is this bad?