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Today's Features

  • BOLIVIA—Taylor is an unusual duck—an odd duck, as Bob Campbell, budget director with the Brunswick County Health Department, refers to him.
    The black-and-white duck has been hanging out near the department for about a year, Campbell says.
    He’s not a bad duck—he doesn’t really cause any problems, except for his duck waste.
    “He makes messes on the sidewalk and doorway,” Campbell said. “Nobody wants to walk in that stuff. Other than that, he doesn’t bother anybody. I’ve seen him actually greet a few people as they come in.”

  •  

    The county is invited to join a worldwide public environmental action event called Earth Hour.

    At 8:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31, millions of people around the globe will switch off the lights of their homes and businesses for one hour to acknowledge a commitment to go actions that benefit the planet in the year ahead.

    Linda Rudick, member of Keep Brunswick County Beautiful, is coordinating local Earth Hour efforts.

  • Brandy’s Coupon Obsession started small, as a way to save cents on the weekly grocery bill.

    Now Brandy Marti, owner of Good Looks Beauty Studio in Calabash, organizes donations from hundreds of local women to help families throughoutBrunswick County.

    Marti started clipping coupons in late 2009 to save money on groceries. Itquickly became an obsession.

    “You start getting a lot of free things,” Marti said.

  • Portraits by Herb Pritchard and pottery by Carla Edstrom are under the spotlight as these two featured artists introduce their latest work to the public at the Franklin Square Gallery’s new Members Show. The show is from March 26-May 5. This cooperative community gallery is in downtown Southport’s historic district.

  • More than 150 years after the first shots of the Civil War were fired, another wave of volunteers is about to descend on America’s storied battlegrounds, only this array of dedicated men and women will be armed with paint brushes, trash bags and weed-whackers.
    The N.C. Maritime Museum at Southport needs volunteers for its Park Day historic preservation event on Saturday, March 31, at 204 East Moore St. in Southport, on the historic Fort Johnston grounds. The event begins at 9 a.m. Rain date will be April 14.

  • Elks to award service March 16
    Shallotte Elks 2854 in Shallotte will honor those who provided outstanding service to the town of Shallotte and Brunswick County at its annual awards dinner at 5:30 p.m. March 16.
    The dinner is open to the public and will take place at The Woodman of The World on Commerce Street in Shallotte. There is an $8 donation for adults and $4 for children younger than 10.

  • Clog for a Cure is a partnership between Jennifer Hoffman of On My Toes Dance Studio and Brunswick County 4-H, created by 4-H teen and On My Toes Dance Studio teen teacher Samantha Lawrence.
    The 4-H special interest group was developed by Lawrence to assist the Brunswick County 4-H Relay for Life team in raising awareness and collecting money for the American Cancer Society. Transportation and organization assistance is provided by dance mom Stephanie Bumgarner and Angie Lawrence, 4-H program assistant.

  • Spring concert and pancake dinner set
    Calabash Presbyterian Church will host the SBIC spring concert beginning at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 18. Local church choirs and groups, along with other area talent, will perform. A love offering will be taken and attendees are requested to bring non-perishable food items for the food pantry.

  • If you are my age, and I suspect many are, you are familiar with the poignant song, “Ah, Sweet Mystery of Life.”
    I remember the first time I heard it. A blind man was bent over the piano pouring his heart into the keys, it seemed. Surely, he felt the mystery of being sightless in a sighted society. It was obvious that he knew well the longing, seeking, striving, waiting, yearning. He understood the burning hopes, the joy and idle tears that fall.

  • By Tom Woods
    Master Gardener
    Higher education in America was once a luxury for the privileged. In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln changed that when he signed the Morrill Act, which established the nation’s land-grant universities and opened doors of higher education to more Americans.
    The act directed funding to agriculture, engineering and mechanical arts education, helping build the infrastructure that has kept us strong and helps feed the world today.