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Today's Features

  • Ask most folks about a plant at Christmas and they’ll mention poinsettias or Christmas trees. Both of those are traditional parts of our holiday celebrations, but neither usually sticks around much past early January. 

    If you want a great Christmas plant that will do great year after year, consider what is now called a “holiday cactus.” These natives of the tropical rainforests of Central and South America boast colorful blossoms in shades of pink, red and white at the tips of each arching stem. 

  • Tom Woods 
    Master Gardener

    Reading nutritional labels can help you make the best food selections for your body’s needs. Taking time to read plant labels can help you to do the same for the plants.

    Before you buy a plant, you need to read and understand information on its label. This is as important for plants as it is for seed, fertilizer, pesticides and herbicides. 

  • Arts Council  grant winners

    The Brunswick Arts Council (BAC) has announced the recipients of the 2010-2011 Grassroots Art Grant, made available through a Grassroots Grant from the North Carolina Arts Council and supported by the National Endowment for the Arts. 

    BAC will award almost $13,000 in grants to nonprofit organizations for support of their work involving art programs in the community. The funds will be matched, dollar for dollar, by the recipient organizations. All projects will benefit citizens of Brunswick County. 

  • The only true balsamic vinegars in the world are from Modena and Reggio, Italy. The tradition started there and is still “artisan-made” today. These vinegars from the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy are truly the finest you can buy. 

  • As my fingers fly over my computer keyboard, I think about Alice in Wonderland and her encounter with the White Rabbit who has no time to say hello, goodbye. He’s in a stew because he is running late for a very important date. 

  • Each year, Rotary International sponsors Group Study Exchanges (GSE) around the world as a cultural and vocational exchange opportunity for business people and professionals that are in the early stages of their careers and are between the ages of 25 and 40.

    Rotary District 7730 (eastern North Carolina and southeastern Virginia) is sponsoring a GSE team to Uruguay in April 2011 and South Brunswick Islands Rotarian Martha Warner has been selected by Rotary District 7730 to be the Rotarian leader of the four to six GSE member team.

  • Mark and Erica Thomas of Shallotte are the parents of a daughter, Lily Grayce Thomas, born at 8:40 a.m. Nov. 3 at New Hanover Regional Medical Center weighing 7 pounds, 3 ounces and measuring 19-inches long.

    She joins brothers Mark, 12, and Kai, 4.

  • Samantha Welch and Joshua Salmons, both of Shallotte, were married Oct. 8 at Harvest Fellowship Church in Shallotte.

    The Rev. Tom Johnson officiated the ceremony.

    The bride is the daughter of Sandy Welch of Calabash.

    The groom is the son of Franklin and Teresa Salmons of Shallotte.

    The bride was given in marriage by her mother.

    Pam Waterbury of Calabash, aunt of the bride, served as matron of honor.

    Zach Varnam of Shallotte, cousin of the groom, served as best man.

  • Pine trees aren’t the only trees that shed needles. Evergreen trees have many needles that change color or turn brown in the fall. This often causes alarm to homeowners who don’t know evergreen trees drop needles.

  • By SUSAN BROWN
    EXTENSION HORTICULTURAL AGENT

    Winter is slowly on its way. It is becoming harder to find interesting color in the garden. Have you noticed the pockets of color along the roadside? 

    Being a Raleigh native and new to the area, I was unsure of what to expect in the fall. It is always a tradition for me to visit Asheville and see the palate of color the leaves create. The rich, reds, bright, yellows and brilliant, oranges are always so vibrant and well worth the trip.